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Full text of "State of the City"

5/S 

San Francisco Public Library 



Government Information Center 

San Francisco Public Library 

100 Larkin Street 5 lh Floor 

San Francisco, CA 94102 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://archive.org/details/stateofcity19992006sanf 



3 1223 09321 1606 




Office of the Mayor fe( SsSmFm Willie Lewis Brown, Jr. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 
JAN 1 3 2000 



STATE OF THE CITY 
October 25. 1999 SAN FRANCISCO 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Presented by Mayor Willie L. Brown Jr. 



SINCE THIS WILL BE THE FINAL REPORT ON THE STATE OF THE CITY OF MY 
FIRST TERM AS MAYOR, I WANT TO SPEND THIS TIME TALKING ABOUT: 

WHERE WE WERE FOUR YEARS AGO; 

THE WORK WE HAVE DONE TOGETHER SINCE THEN; 

AND THE CHALLENGES WE MUST MEET IN THE NEAR FUTURE. 

IN 1995, SAN FRANCISCO WAS A GREAT CITY IN DANGER OF LOSING ITS WAY. 
THE LOCAL ECONOMY WAS IN A TAILSPIN; MUNI WAS UNDERSTAFFED AND 
UNDERFUNDED, WITH AN OBSOLETE FLEET OF VEHICLES AND A CULTURE OF 
DESTRUCTIVE HOSTILITY BETWEEN WORKERS AND MANAGEMENT. 

HOURS HAD BEEN CUT TO THE BONE AT OUR PUBLIC LIBRARIES, MANY OF 
WHICH LACKED THE RESOURCES EVEN TO SHELVE THEIR BOOKS; OUR 911 
SERVICE WAS ON THE VERGE OF COLLAPSE; AN OUTRAGEOUS NUMBER OF 
SUICIDES PLAGUED THE YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER, AND PARKS AND 
PLAYGROUNDS HAD BECOME UNSAFE AND UNUSABLE. 

OWING TO A LACK OF LEADERSHIP, THE MACHINERY OF CITY GOVERNMENT 
HAD BEEN REDUCED TO WARRING PRINCIPALITIES OF BUREAUCRATS MORE 
CONCERNED WITH PROTECTING THEIR PRIVATE TURF THAN THE PUBLIC'S 
INTEREST. 

AS A RESULT, PROJECTS VITAL TO JUMP-STARTING SAN FRANCISCO'S 
ECONOMY WERE STALLED: MISSION BAY WAS GOING NOWHERE; UCSF WAS 
POISED TO BUILD ITS SECOND CAMPUS OUTSIDE THE CITY, AND THERE WAS 
LITTLE FOCUS ON THE POTENTIAL OF TREASURE ISLAND. 

OVER THE LAST FOUR YEARS, WE HAVE WORKED TOGETHER AND 
SUCCESSFULLY TO GET SAN FRANCISCO MOVING FORWARD. 

OUR ECONOMY IS THRIVING AGAIN; WE'VE REGAINED THE 40,000 JOBS LOST 
DURING THE FIRST FIVE YEARS OF THIS DECADE, AND CREATED ANOTHER 

1 DR. CARLTON B. GOODLETT PLACE, ROOM 200 SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102 

(415) 554-6141 
RECYCLED PAPER 



20,000. UNEMPLOYMENT HAS BEEN CUT IN HALF, SERIOUS CRIME IS DOWN 
FORTY PERCENT, AND MUNI IS SLOWLY BUT SURELY ON THE MEND. 

TOGETHER, WE'VE MADE PUBLIC HOUSING LIVABLE AGAIN, WHICH - GIVEN 
WHERE WE STARTED - IS ONE OF THE MOST DRAMATIC TURNAROUNDS IN 
THE NATION. 

WE'VE ESTABLISHED MODEL PROGRAMS FOR JUVENILE OFFENDERS; 
BRANCH LIBRARIES ARE OPEN TODAY MORE HOURS THAN THEY ARE 
CLOSED; OUR PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS ARE BEING RESTORED; WE'VE 
ACHIEVED BACK-TO-BACK BUDGET SURPLUSES OF $100 MILLION, AND CITY 
DEPARTMENTS ARE NOW WORKING WITH, INSTEAD OF AGAINST, EACH 
OTHER BECAUSE OF THE LEADERSHIP WE HAVE PROVIDED. 

EACH OF US CAN BE JUSTIFIABLY PROUD OF THE THINGS WE HAVE 
ACCOMPLISHED AND THE PROGRESS WE HAVE MADE TOGETHER. 

IN THE LAST FEW MONTHS, MONEY MAGAZINE NAMED SAN FRANCISCO THE 
BEST BIG CITY IN AMERICA; ZERO POPULATION GROWTH GAVE US AN "A" 
RATING AS A CHILD-FRIENDLY CITY, AND SEVENTEEN MAGAZINE CALLED 
THIS THE BEST CITY IN THE NATION FOR TEENAGERS. 

BUT IF OUTSIDERS LOOK AT SAN FRANCISCO WITH ENVY AND AWE, THOSE 
OF US ON THE INSIDE KNOW FULL WELL THAT MUCH REMAINS TO BE DONE. 

THERE IS A DEEP SENSE OF FRUSTRATION AMONG A GREAT MANY SAN 
FRANCISCANS THAT LIFE HERE IS NOT AS GOOD AS IT SHOULD BE, AND 
THEY'RE RIGHT ABOUT THAT. 

THE PEOPLE OF SAN FRANCISCO RECOGNIZE AND APPRECIATE WHAT WE 
HAVE DONE, BUT OUR ACCOMPLISHMENTS HAVE BEEN DIMINISHED BY THE 
GROWING STRESSES OF DAILY LIFE IN THIS CITY: 

TRAFFIC CONGESTION SEEMS TO GROW WORSE EACH DAY; 

THE CHARACTER OF OUR NEIGHBORHOODS IS BEING THREATENED; 

EACH DAY, TOO MANY SAN FRANCISCANS WORK LONG AND HARD 
JUST TO EARN A WAGE THAT CAN'T KEEP PACE WITH THE CITY'S SOARING 
COST OF LIVING. AND EACH NIGHT, TOO MANY HARDWORKING SAN 
FRANCISCANS GO TO BED WONDERING WHAT THEY'LL DO, AND WHERE 
THEY'LL GO, ONCE THEY CAN NO LONGER AFFORD TO KEEP A SAN 
FRANCISCO ROOF OVER THEIR HEADS. 

IN A VERY REAL SENSE, WE HAVE BECOME THE VICTIMS OF OUR OWN 
SUCCESS. 



OUR ECONOMIC GAINS HAVE USHERED IN AN ENTIRELY NEW AND 
MADDENINGLY COMPLEX SET OF PROBLEMS. AND MEETING THE 
CHALLENGES OF OUR PROSPERITY IS THE GREAT PIECE OF UNFINISHED 
BUSINESS WE NOW MUST FACE. 

THE HEART OF THE TASK BEFORE US IS TO PROTECT OUR THRIVING 
ECONOMY, WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY MITIGATING ITS CONSEQUENCES. 

THERE IS SIMPLY NO OTHER WAY TO GO ABOUT IT, BECAUSE A STRONG 
LOCAL ECONOMY IS FAR MORE THAN JUST AN OCCASION FOR BRAGGING 
RIGHTS, IT IS THE LIFEBLOOD OF THIS CITY. 

SAN FRANCISCANS ARE RIGHTFULLY ACCUSTOMED TO A WIDE ARRAY OF 
SERVICES, PARTICULARLY FOR THOSE WHO ARE IN SOME WAY 
DISADVANTAGED. 

BUT, GIVEN THE REDUCTIONS IN FUNDING AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR SUCH 
SERVICES AT THE STATE AND FEDERAL LEVEL, WE'VE BEEN LEFT PRETTY 
MUCH ON OUR OWN. 

AN ECONOMY THAT CONTINUES TO GROW AND PROSPER IS TODAY OUR 
ONLY HOPE FOR THE RESOURCES WE NEED TO FUND AND MAINTAIN THESE 
VITAL SERVICES. 

IN THIS ERA OF GLOBALIZATION, WE CAN NO LONGER JUST ASSUME THAT 
WE WILL CONTINUE TO RETAIN EXISTING BUSINESSES AND EMPLOYERS AND 
ATTRACT NEW ONES, SIMPLY BECAUSE SAN FRANCISCO IS SUCH A GREAT 
CITY. 

THERE ARE GREAT CITIES ELSEWHERE IN THIS NATION AND THROUGHOUT 
THE WORLD, PLUS COUNTLESS WANNABE GREAT CITIES EAGER TO 
DUPLICATE OUR SUCCESSES. MANY OF THEM HAVE WORKFORCES AS 
SKILLED AS OURS. MANY MORE HOLD THE DOUBLE ATTRACTION OF CHEAP 
LABOR AND CHEAPER HOUSING, NOT TO MENTION AMPLE LAND FOR NEW 
DEVELOPMENT. 

THUS, WE CANNOT BEHAVE AS THOUGH OUR RECENT ECONOMIC SUCCESS 
IS SOME KIND OF DONE DEED WHICH WILL ALLOW US TO MOVE ON TO 
OTHER, MORE PRESSING PROBLEMS. , 

ON THE CONTRARY, WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO WORK HARD TO ENSURE 
THAT OUR ECONOMY CONTINUES TO PROSPER AND TO GROW, PRECISELY 
BECAUSE THAT'S OUR ONLY HOPE FOR ADDRESSING THOSE VERY 
PROBLEMS. THOSE ARE THE REALITIES WE MUST CONTEND WITH. DOING SO 
WILL REQUIRE A CAREFUL BALANCING OF THE NEEDS OF OUR ECONOMY 
WITH THE QUALITY OF LIFE SAN FRANCISCANS DESERVE. 



STARTING NOW, AND FOR THE FORESEEABLE FUTURE, WE MUST 
CONCENTRATE AND REDOUBLE OUR EFFORTS IN THREE BROAD AREAS: 

AFFORDABILITY; 

TRAFFIC AND CONGESTION; 

AND NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER. 

I. AFFORDABILITY 



A. HOUSING 

THE MOST DIFFICULT AND SERIOUS ISSUE FACING US TODAY IS THE 
ESCALATING COST OF HOUSING. NOTHING THREATENS OUR DIVERSITY 
MORE THAN THE GROWING SCARCITY OF DECENT AFFORDABLE HOUSING 
FOR MODERATE AND LOW INCOME PEOPLE. 

THE LAWS OF SUPPLY AND DEMAND WILL NOT SOLVE THIS PROBLEM. WE 
HAVE TOO LITTLE LAND IN SAN FRANCISCO, AND TOO MANY PEOPLE WHO 
WANT TO LIVE HERE. INDEED, MARKET FORCES BY THEMSELVES WILL ONLY 
MAKE MATTERS WORSE, AND THIS CITY AND ITS ECONOMY WILL BE POORER 
FOR IT. 

FOR THE LAST FOUR YEARS, OUR ADMINISTRATION HAS PURSUED TWO 
GENERAL POLICIES: FIRST, PRESERVE EXISTING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE 
HOUSING; AND SECOND, BUILD OR ACQUIRE NEW AFFORDABLE HOUSING. 

THIS APPROACH HAS ALLOWED US TO MAKE SOME PROGRESS: 

SAN FRANCISCO VOTERS APPROVED A $1 00 MILLION AFFORDABLE 
HOUSING BOND MEASURE, 

FIVE THOUSAND NEW HOUSING UNITS HAVE BEEN BUILT OR FINANCED, 
INCLUDING 1,100 UNITS FOR FORMERLY HOMELESS PEOPLE AND FAMILIES, 

AND 980 NEW UNITS ON TREASURE ISLAND, WHERE 50 FAMILIES ARE 
NOW MOVING IN EACH MONTH. 

OF THE SIX THOUSAND NEW HOUSING UNITS NOW BEING BUILT AT 
MISSION BAY, NEARLY A THIRD (1,700) WILL BE PRICED AFFORDABLY. 

IN OTHER WORDS, WE'VE MADE A START, BUT IT'S ONLY A START, AND OVER 
THE NEXT FOUR YEARS, WE MUST DO MUCH, MUCH MORE. 



AT THE LOCAL LEVEL, WE MUST BEGIN DEVELOPMENT PLANS FOR NEW, 
AFFORDABLE HOUSING AT THE HUNTERS POINT SHIPYARD. 

LIVE-WORK UNITS SHOULD BE TREATED AS NEW HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS, 
REQUIRED TO PAY THEIR FULL SHARE OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING SET 
ASIDES AS WELL AS CITY AND SCHOOL DISTRICT FEES, 

AT THE SAME TIME, WE NEED TO WORK TOWARD LEGISLATION CREATING A 
LIMITED EQUITY OWNERSHIP PROGRAM THAT WILL OFFER TENANTS OF 
MODERATE MEANS AN OPPORTUNITY TO JOINTLY BUY THEIR APARTMENT 
BUILDINGS. 

ALL OF THIS WILL HELP, BUT FULLY MASTERING THE CHALLENGE OF 
AFFORDABLE HOUSING WILL REQUIRE US TO REACH WELL BEYOND THE 
BOUNDARIES OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

THE PROBLEM OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING IS NOT UNIQUE TO OUR CITY. IT IS 
A CONCERN THROUGHOUT THE BAY AREA, AND, AS I CAN ATTEST FROM MY 
WORK AS CHAIR OF THE HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
COMMITTEE OF THE U.S. CONFERENCE OF MAYORS, IT IS ALSO A SERIOUS 
PROBLEM ELSEWHERE IN CALIFORNIA AND IN MANY OTHER PARTS OF THE 
NATION. 

WE NEED TO REACH OUT, ORGANIZE, AND ENERGIZE HELP FROM THE 
OUTSIDE. 

WE SHOULD BEGIN BY HOSTING A BAY AREA "AFFORDABLE HOUSING 
SUMMIT," TO DEVISE A REGIONWIDE APPROACH TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING 
AND HOMELESSNESS. 

AND, AS THE MOST LOYAL DEMOCRATIC CITY IN CALIFORNIA, IF NOT THE 
NATION, WE MUST CONTINUE TO PRESS OUR DEMOCRATIC GOVERNOR TO 
SUPPORT A STATEWIDE AFFORDABLE HOUSING BOND, AND IMPRESS UPON 
THE NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY THE NEED FOR A RENEWED 
COMMITMENT AND RESOURCES TO RESOLVE THE PROBLEMS OF 
AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND HOMELESSNESS. 

B. LIVING WAGE 

BUT THE ISSUE OF AFFORDABILITY EXTENDS BEYOND HOUSING. IT 
INCLUDES, FOR EXAMPLE, THE EVER WIDENING EARNINGS GAP BETWEEN 
THOSE WHO ARE DOING WELL AND THOSE WHO MUST STRUGGLE JUST TO 
GET BY. 

THIS, TOO, IS A REGIONAL, STATE, AND NATIONAL PROBLEM, AND WE MUST 
DO OUR PART TO HELP ADVANCE A SHIFT IN THE POLICIES AND PRIORITIES 



THAT NOW.GOVERN SUCH THINGS AS HEALTH CARE, EDUCATION, AND 
WELFARE. 

IN THE MEANTIME, HOWEVER, THERE ARE THINGS WE MUST DO AT THE 
LOCAL LEVEL. 

FIRST, WE MUST PRESS AHEAD WITH OUR UNIVERSAL HEALTH CARE 
PROPOSAL, INCLUDING PASSAGE OF PROPOSITION A, THE LAGUNA HONDA 
BOND MEASURE. THE COSTS OF HEALTH CARE HAVE BECOME A MAJOR 
BURDEN ON WORKING PEOPLE, SMALL BUSINESSES, AND CITY 
GOVERNMENT. THIS PROPOSAL WILL HELP SMALL EMPLOYERS PROVIDE 
COVERAGE FOR THEIR WORKERS, ENABLE WORKING SAN FRANCISCANS TO 
PURCHASE COVERAGE ON THEIR OWN, AND SAVE THE CITY $7 FOR EVERY 
DOLLAR IN EMERGENCY CARE COSTS WE SPEND ON THE PREVENTIVE, 
MANAGED, AND LONG-TERM CARE COMPONENTS OF THIS PROPOSAL. 

WE MUST EXPAND THE ASSISTANCE WE GIVE TO SMALL BUSINESSES, BOTH 
THOSE ALREADY IN EXISTENCE AND NEW ONES JUST STARTING UP, 
BECAUSE IT IS THESE FIRMS WHICH EMPLOY A MAJORITY OF OUR CITIZENS. 

FINALLY, WE MUST REACH AGREEMENT ON A LIVING WAGE. ALL OF US 
ALREADY AGREE IN CONCEPT THAT SAN FRANCISCANS WHO HOLD DOWN 
FULL TIME JOBS, ESPECIALLY IN HOUSEHOLDS WITH TWO WAGE EARNERS, 
OUGHT TO BE ABLE TO SUPPORT THEMSELVES AND THEIR FAMILIES ON 
WHAT THEY EARN. 

IN A FEW SPECIFIC INSTANCES, WE'VE ALREADY BEEN ABLE TO MOVE IN 
THAT DIRECTION. WE SECURED, FOR EXAMPLE, A $2 HOURLY WAGE 
INCREASE FOR HOME HEALTH CARE WORKERS; WE'RE WORKING TOWARD A 
SIMILAR INCREASE FOR THE MEN AND WOMEN WHO PROVIDE SECURITY AT 
THE AIRPORT, AND, INDUSTRY-BY-INDUSTRY, WE'VE BEEN WORKING 
STEADILY TO TRY TO GET WAGES MOVING UPWARD. 

CLEARLY, THIS IS A CRITICAL AND PRIORITY ISSUE FOR OUR CITY, BUT WE 
MUST PROCEED CAREFULLY. IF WE EMPLOY A SLEDGEHAMMER WHEN A 
SCALPEL IS CALLED FOR, WE RISK PLACING TOO GREAT A BURDEN ON 
LOCAL EMPLOYERS, AND OUR ECONOMY WILL SUFFER AS A CONSEQUENCE. 
IF WE EXCEED WHAT CITY GOVERNMENT ITSELF CAN AFFORD, WE'LL END UP 
PUTTING VITAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES IN JEOPARDY. 



II. TRAFFIC AND CONGESTION 

IN THE LAST FEW YEARS, WE HAVE TAKEN NUMEROUS STEPS TO UNCLOG 
OUR STREETS, BUT IT HASN'T BEEN ENOUGH, AND IF WE DON'T DO MORE - 
AND DO IT SOON - TRAFFIC AND CONGESTION WILL OVERWHELM ALL OF US: 



25,000 VISITORS A DAY TO THE SONY METREON MEANS MORE TRAFFIC; SO 
DO THE BOOMING MULTIMEDIA INDUSTRY AND THE NEW GIANTS BALLPARK 
IN THE SOUTH OF MARKET AREA; SO DO NEW NIGHTCLUBS, BUSINESSES, 
AND CULTURAL ATTRACTIONS, NOT TO MENTION THE BAY BRIDGE RETROFIT 
AND LOSS OF PARKING SPACES 

MUNI IS ON THE MEND, AND THAT IS A MAJOR COMPONENT OF THE 
SOLUTION. MUCH REMAINS TO BE DONE, BUT UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 
MUNI'S NEW GENERAL MANAGER - MICHAEL "MASS TRANSIT" BURNS AS WE 
CALL HIM - THINGS ARE GETTING A LITTLE BETTER EACH DAY. 

A NEW LABOR AGREEMENT HAS ELIMINATED "MISS OUTS." WE'VE 
DEDICATED ANOTHER $15 MILLION THIS YEAR ALONE TO MAKE SERVICE 
MORE RELIABLE. WE'VE ACHIEVED FULL STAFFING OF MUNI OPERATORS 
AND MECHANICS FOR THE FIRST TIME IN YEARS. WE'RE REPLACING - AS 
QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE THE 70 PERCENT OF MUNI'S ROLLING STOCK THAT'S 
OVER 20 YEARS OLD. AND WE'RE SUPPORTING PROPOSITION E, WHICH WILL 
EARMARK FUNDING AND ESTABLISH A GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE TO GIVE 
MUNI LONG-TERM STABILITY AND GREATER RELIABILITY. 

IN THE COMING TERM, MR. BURNS ASSURES US, MUNI WILL OPEN A NEW BUS 
ROUTE THROUGH THE SOUTH OF MARKET AREA; INCREASE EXPRESS BUS 
SERVICE DURING COMMUTE HOURS; COMPLETE THE F-LINE ALONG THE 
EMBARCADERO, AND MOVE FORWARD ON CONSTRUCTION OF THE THIRD 
STREET LIGHT RAIL LINE. 

IMPROVING MUNI IS THE FIRST COMPONENT OF SOLVING OUR CONGESTION 
AND TRAFFIC PROBLEMS, BUT IT IS FAR FROM THE ONLY COMPONENT. 
"TRANSIT FIRST" DOESN'T MEAN "TRANSIT ONLY." 

WE NEED A FULL RANGE OF OPTIONS AND A WORKABLE MIX OF PUBLIC 
TRANSIT, ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION, AND MORE PARKING SPACES. 

TO IMPROVE PARKING IN THE SHORT TERM, WE'RE ADDING FLOORS TO CITY 
GARAGES, SUCH AS THE ONE AT FIFTH AND MISSION AND IMPLEMENTING 
ATTENDANT ASSISTED PARKING AT SOME CITY GARAGES, WHICH MAKES 
FOR MORE EFFICIENT USE OF PARKING SPACES. 

WE'VE ADDED 400 TAXI CABS IN THE LAST YEAR TO ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO 
LEAVE THEIR CARS AT HOME, AND WE'RE INVESTIGATING ARRANGEMENTS 
WITH PRIVATE BUSINESSES THAT HAVE AVAILABLE SPACES WE HOPE TO 
LEASE FOR PUBLIC USE. 

IN THE LONGER TERM, WE NEED TO ESTABLISH SATELLITE PARKING LOTS, 
WITH FREE SHUTTLE SERVICE INTO THE CITY, AND WE NEED TO EXPAND THE 



USE OF ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION, SUCH AS WALKING AND 
BICYCLING. OVER THE LAST FOUR YEARS, WE'VE ADDED BIKE LANES 
AROUND THE CITY, AND WE NEED TO ADD MORE. 

FINALLY, WE MUST STRENGTHEN ENFORCEMENT OF TRAFFIC AND PARKING 
LAWS TO PREVENT A STATE OF PERPETUAL GRIDLOCK. 

THERE ARE 100 NEW PARKING CONTROL OFFICERS IN THIS YEAR'S BUDGET, 
AND THEY'RE BEING HIRED FOR ONE PURPOSE: TO KEEP TRAFFIC MOVING 
SMOOTHLY THROUGH MAJOR INTERSECTIONS. 

THE 65 PCO'S WE HIRED LAST YEAR TO PATROL INTERSECTIONS ALONG 
MARKET STREET HAVE IMPROVED TRAFFIC FLOW AND INCREASED MUNI 
RELIABILITY BY 15 PERCENT, SO WE'RE FAIRLY CONFIDENT THIS APPROACH 
WILL BE HELPFUL. 

WE'VE IMPLEMENTED "UNCLOG THE STREETS" PARTS I AND II TO PUT 
SPECIAL FOCUS ON TRAFFIC CONGESTION, AND WE'VE STEPPED UP 
ENFORCEMENT AGAINST RED LIGHT RUNNERS THROUGH STIFF NEW FINES 
AND MORE OFFICERS ON PATROL. 

DON'T BE SURPRISED IF WE COME TO YOU WITH LEGISLATION TO LEVY 
DOUBLE FINES FOR DOUBLE PARKING. 

DON'T BE SURPRISED IF WE COME TO YOU WITH LEGISLATION TO LIMIT 
DELIVERY SERVICES FROM 9 P.M TO 6 A.M. 

MUCH LIKE THE TROUBLES THAT HAVE PLAGUED MUNI, OUR TRAFFIC, 
PARKING, AND CONGESTION PROBLEMS WILL NOT YIELD TO A 100-DAY 
MIRACLE FIX. BUT WE'RE WORKING HARD EVERY DAY ON A NUMBER OF 
FRONTS, DEVELOPING NEW STRATEGIES AND MEASURES TO UNSNARL 
TRAFFIC, MAKE OUR STREETS SAFER, IMPROVE OUR TRANSIT SYSTEM AND 
MAKE OUR CITY MORE LIVABLE. 

III. NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER 



SAN FRANCISCO'S NEIGHBORHOODS ARE AS DIVERSE AS ITS POPULATION, 
AND EACH ONE HAS ITS OWN UNIQUE CHARACTER. 

OUR COLLECTIVE RESPONSIBILITY AS A CITY GOVERNMENT IS TO GIVE SAN 
FRANCISCANS THE OPPORTUNITY AND THE MEANS TO PROTECT, PRESERVE, 
AND, IN COME CASES, TRANSFORM THE NEIGHBORHOODS IN WHICH THEY 
LIVE. 

IN DOING SO, WE MUST CONSTANTLY REMIND OURSELVES THAT SAN 
FRANCISCO IS NOT A ONE-SIZE FITS ALL CITY. FOR EXAMPLE, NORTH BEACH 



RESIDENTS FOUGHT TOOTH AND NAIL AGAINST THE CONSTRUCTION OF A 
RITE AID DRUG STORE IN THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD. BUT RESIDENTS OF THE 
OCEAN MERCED INGLESIDE DISTRICT SUPPORTED A NEW RITE AID THAT 
WILL IMPROVE SHOPPING AND THE LOOK OF THE STREET. 

IT IS BOTH NAIVE AND COUNTERPRODUCTIVE TO ASSUME THAT WE CAN 
DEVISE SOME RIGID DEVELOPMENT TEMPLATE THAT WILL FIT EVERY 
NEIGHBORHOOD IN THE CITY. 

THERE ARE, HOWEVER, SOME AREAS IN WHICH WE ARE WORKING TO 
IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE NEIGHBORHOOD BY NEIGHBORHOOD: 

1. IMPROVING PARKS AND OPEN SPACES. 

WE'RE MAKING PROGRESS ON THIS FRONT. WE'VE RESTORED 151 
POSITIONS CUT FROM THE BUDGET BY PREVIOUS ADMINISTRATIONS, AND 
WE'VE COMMITTED OVER $1 MILLION TO THE PARK RENAISSANCE PROGRAM. 
THOSE FUNDS HAVE BEEN AND ARE BEING USED TO SPRUCE UP 21 PARKS 
AND RECREATION CENTERS. 

WE'VE RESTORED FIVE SOCCER FIELDS; AND REHABILITATED 34 
NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS. NEARLY $45 MILLION IN CAPITOL PROJECTS ARE 
UNDERWAY. 

WE'VE ASKED SAN FRANCISCANS WHAT THEY WANT DONE AND HAVE 
DEVELOPED A FOUR-POINT PLAN BASED UPON THE RESULTS OF OUR 
CITYWIDE COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT SURVEY. 

THAT PLAN INCLUDES: PASSING A $110 MILLION BOND MEASURE TO 
RESTORE OUR PARKS; SEEKING GREATER PRIVATE SECTOR HELP, AND 
LARGER CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE STATE AND FEDERAL LEVELS; 
ACTIVELY SUPPORTING A STATE BOND MEASURE FOR PARK REPAIRS ON 
THE MARCH BALLOT, AND WORKING TOWARD EXTENDING THE OPEN SPACE 
FUND FOR ANOTHER 30 YEARS. 

2. CLEAN STREETS 

THIS IS A SHARED RESPONSIBILITY, AND CITY GOVERNMENT IS DOING ITS 
PART. WE'VE EXTENDED STREET SWEEPING TO SEVEN DAYS A WEEK; ADDED 
THOUSANDS OF GARBAGE CANS, 500 WITH RECYCLING TOPS; PURCHASED 
15 GREEN SWEEPING MACHINES, AND HELD FIVE GREAT SWEEPS TO 
ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO KEEP THE STREETS CLEAN. 

BUT GOVERNMENT CAN'T DO THIS ALONE. WE NEED PROMOTIONAL, 
EDUCATIONAL, AND OUTREACH PROGRAMS TO UNDERSCORE THE DAMAGE 
LITTER DOES TO THE CITY AND ITS PEOPLE. 



3. SAFE STREETS ARE CRITICAL TO OUR QUALITY OF LIFE 

SERIOUS CRIME HAS GONE DOWN DRAMATICALLY, BUT WE NEED TO DO 
MORE. WE'RE REDOUBLING OUR EFFORTS TO STOP DRUG DEALING IN THE 
TENDERLOIN AND MISSION DISTRICTS, AND, IN ORDER TO ENSURE THAT 
NONE OF OUR NEIGHBORHOODS IS HELD HOSTAGE TO DRIVE-BY DRUG 
TRAFFICKING, WE'LL MOVE FORWARD WITH OUR PLANS TO PROSECUTE 
DEALERS TO THE FULL EXTENT THE LAW ALLOWS. 

POLICE PRESENCE DETERS CRIME, WHETHER DRUG DEALING OR SPEEDING. 
WE WILL KEEP THIS FORCE AT FULL STAFFING, AND WE WILL CONTINUE TO 
PUT IN POLICE SUBSTATIONS IN THOSE COMMUNITIES REQUESTING THEM. 

SAN FRANCISCO DESERVES TO BE KNOWN AS THE SAFEST CITY IN AMERICA. 

4. YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES 

NONE OF US CAN BE PRODUCTIVE CITIZENS IF WE'RE CONSTANTLY WORRIED 
ABOUT FINDING QUALITY CARE AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR OUR CHILDREN. 

THAT'S WHY, OVER THE LAST FIVE YEARS, WE'VE OPENED FIVE BEACON 
CENTERS; BUILT THE EXCELSIOR YOUTH CENTER; INCREASED FUNDING FOR 
YOUTH JOB TRAINING BY 250 PERCENT; OPENED THE FIRST CHILD CARE 
CENTER AT CITY HALL, AND INCREASED CHILD CARE FUNDING FROM $2 
MILLION TO $20 MILLION. 

OVER THE NEXT FEW YEARS, WE WILL CREATE 2,700 NEW CHILD CARE 
SLOTS WITH CITY FUNDING AND LEVERAGED STATE AND FEDERAL FUNDS; 
SET ASIDE $10 MILLION IN HUD FUNDING TO RENOVATE AND EXPAND CHILD 
CARE CENTERS; LAUNCH A PROJECT TO REDUCE AFRICAN AMERICAN 
INFANT MORTALITY, AND EDUCATE YOUTH ON VIOLENCE AND SUBSTANCE 
ABUSE AT SCHOOLS THROUGH A $2.7 MILLION SAFE STREETS GRANT. 

5. IMPROVE OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

A PRIMARY BENCHMARK FOR MEASURING A CITY'S LIVABILITY IS THE 
QUALITY OF ITS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. AND WHILE CITY GOVERNMENT HAS NO 
CONTROL OVER THE SYSTEM ITSELF, WE HAVE A CIVIC OBLIGATION TO BE 
INVOLVED AND HELP OUT WHERE WE CAN. 

LAST MONTH, FOR EXAMPLE, WE HELD A CITYWIDE "INCREASE THE PEACE" 
DAY TO TALK ABOUT SCHOOL VIOLENCE AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION. WE'VE 
PROVIDED FUNDS TO KEEP ARTS PROGRAMS IN PLACE FOR THE YOUNGEST 



SCHOOL CHILDREN, AND WE'RE LOBBYING AT THE STATE LEVEL TO ENSURE 
THAT THIS PROGRAM CONTINUES. 

UNFORTUNATELY, CALIFORNIA RANKS DEAD LAST IN THE NATION IN 
RESOURCES ALLOCATED TO OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS. SO, IN ORDER TO TAKE 
UP THE SLACK, WE'RE WORKING WITH ACTING SUPERINTENDENT LINDA 
DAVIS, BOARD PRESIDENT JUANITA OWENS, AND OTHERS IN THE SCHOOL 
DISTRICT ON AN INNOVATIVE "ADOPT A SCHOOL" PROGRAM TO CREATE 
PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN INDIVIDUAL SCHOOLS AND LOCAL 
CORPORATIONS. 

WE'VE ENJOYED GREAT SUCCESS WITH THESE SAME FIRMS IN 
ESTABLISHING "ADOPT A CHILD CARE CENTER" PARTNERSHIPS, AND I'M 
CONFIDENT WE CAN DO THE SAME FOR OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

6. HOMELESSNESS: 

FINALLY, THERE IS THE PROBLEM OF HOMELESSNESS, WHICH HAS RAISED 
CONCERNS IN EVERY NEIGHBORHOOD IN OUR CITY: 

OVER THE LAST FOUR YEARS, WE'VE DRAMATICALLY INCREASED SERVICES 
TO THE HOMELESS. WE'VE ALLOCATED $14 MILLION IN THE LAST THREE 
YEARS TO IMPLEMENT SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT ON DEMAND. 

WE'VE DEDICATED OVER $2.5 MILLION THIS YEAR ALONE FOR EXPANDED 
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES; WE PROVIDE NEARLY 1,500 EMERGENCY 
SHELTER BEDS EVERY NIGHT, AND WE'RE MASTER LEASING RESIDENTIAL 
HOTELS AND MOVING PEOPLE OUT OF SHELTERS AND ON THE ROAD TO 
SELF SUFFICIENCY. 

YET THE PROBLEM OF HOMELESSNESS PERSISTS, AND MANY FEEL IT'S 
GETTING WORSE. 

IN PART, THAT'S BECAUSE WE'VE BUILT AN ARRAY OF SERVICES THAT ARE 
ATTRACTIVE TO THE HOMELESS, SO THEY JUST KEEP COMING. MORE THAN 
HALF THE PEOPLE NOW ON OUR STREETS HAVE BEEN HERE FOR LESS THAN 
ONE YEAR, WHICH MEANS THAT WE'RE MOVING PEOPLE THROUGH THE 
SYSTEM ON A REGULAR BASIS, BUT MORE FOLLOW. 

AS COMPASSIONATE AS WE ARE, SAN FRANCISCANS SHOULD NOT AND 
CANNOT CARRY THIS BURDEN ALONE. WE MUST WORK WITH THE OTHER 
NINE BAY AREA COUNTIES AND WITH STATE GOVERNMENT TO EQUALIZE 
GENERAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS, ENSURE A MORE LEVEL PLAYING FIELD 
WHEN IT COMES TO SHELTERS AND HOUSING FACILITIES, AND TO MODIFY 
STATE LAWS SO THAT WE CAN MORE EFFECTIVELY ASSIST THE MENTALLY 
ILL HOMELESS WHO ROAM OUR STREETS. 



WE MUST ALSO DEVISE A SYSTEM WHICH ALLOWS US TO PROVIDE THE 
HOMELESS WITH RENT VOUCHERS IN LIEU OF CASH, BUT ONLY IF THERE ARE 
ROOMS AND/OR HOUSING AVAILABLE TO THEM. 

THERE HAS BEEN SOME CONCERN EXPRESSED RECENTLY THAT THIS 
ADMINISTRATION IS SOMEHOW COMMITTED TO TRAMPLING THE CIVIL RIGHTS 
OF OUR CITY'S HOMELESS POPULATION. 

LET ME ASSURE YOU THAT NOTHING COULD BE FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH. 
FEW IN OUR CITY ARE MORE COMMITTED TO THE CAUSE OF UNIVERSAL CIVIL 
RIGHTS THAN I AM. 

LONG AGO, I LEARNED FIRSTHAND THE HARD AND PAINFUL LESSONS OF 
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN GOVERNMENT BY THE MAJORITY SYSTEMATICALLY 
ABROGATES THE RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES OF A DESPISED MINORITY, AND I 
HAVE NEVER BEEN IN DANGER OF FORGETTING THOSE DIFFICULT LESSONS. 

BUT THOSE WHO ARE HOMELESS - EITHER THROUGH MISFORTUNE OR 
CHOICE - ARE NOT THE ONLY ONES WITH RIGHTS 

THROUGHOUT THIS CITY, THERE ARE MEN AND WOMEN WHO OWN AND 
OPERATE SMALL BUSINESSES. THEY WORK HARD TO MAKE A GO OF IT, AND 
THEY PROVIDE JOBS FOR OTHERS. 

YET FAR TOO MANY OF THEM ARE FORCED TO BEGIN EACH WORK DAY 
PICKING UP TRASH AND WASHING AWAY EXCREMENT LEFT OVERNIGHT. 

THAT SAME SCENE GETS REPLAYED IN NEIGHBORHOODS WHERE FAMILIES 
ARE TRYING TO RAISE CHILDREN AND SECURE A DECENT QUALITY OF LIFE 
FOR THEMSELVES. 

SO, WHILE WE'LL CONTINUE TO BEEF UP HOMELESS SERVICES, WORK 
TOWARD REGIONAL APPROACHES TO THE HOMELESS PROBLEM, AND 
PRESSURE STATE GOVERNMENT TO DO ITS PART, WE'RE ALSO GOING TO 
ENFORCE LAWS AGAINST URINATING IN PUBLIC, SLEEPING IN THE PARKS, 
AND BLOCKING PUBLIC SIDEWALKS, BECAUSE THAT IS THE BEST APPROACH 
FOR SAFEGUARDING THE RIGHTS, LIBERTIES, AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF ALL 
SAN FRANCISCANS. 

HOMELESSNESS IS A COMPLICATED ISSUE, BECAUSE IT INVOLVES POVERTY, 
MENTAL ILLNESS AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE. 

HOMELESS WILL NOT YIELD TO QUICK FIXES, SOUND BITES, OR SLICK 
BROCHURES. 



WELL-INTENTIONED, BUT MISGUIDED EFFORTS TO MAKE THE PROBLEM GO 
AWAY ONCE AND FOR ALL CALL TO MIND H. L. MENCKEN'S OBSERVATION 
THAT FOR EVERY COMPLEX PROBLEM, THERE IS A SOLUTION, WHICH IS 
SIMPLE, STRAIGHTFORWARD, AND WRONG! 

ONLY BY STAYING THE COURSE AND DEVELOPING NEW APPROACHES THAT 
FIT INTO A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF ACTION CAN WE BEGIN TO RESOLVE 
THIS MOST STUBBORN OF CIVIC PROBLEMS. 

THAT THEN, IS MY ROAD MAP OF WHERE WE NEED TO TAKE THE CITY OVER 
THE NEXT FOUR YEARS. 

IF THE TASKS BEFORE US SEEM A LITTLE INTIMIDATING, TAKE COMFORT IN 
THE FACT THAT WE WON'T HAVE TO ACHIEVE ALL OUR GOALS ALONE. 

SAN FRANCISCO'S GREATEST ASSET, THE SECRET WEAPON THAT, MORE 
OFTEN THAN NOT, HELPS US SUCCEED AGAINST THE ODDS, IS THE PEOPLE 
OF THIS CITY. 

TIME AND AGAIN OVER THE LAST FOUR YEARS, YOU HAVE COME FORWARD 
WITH IDEAS THAT HAVE HELPED MAKE SAN FRANCISCO A BETTER PLACE 
AND MADE THIS ADMINISTRATION'S JOB EASIER. 

YOU'VE DONE IT DURING THE NUMEROUS CITYWIDE SUMMITS WE'VE HELD; 
DURING MY OPEN DOOR DAY; AND THROUGH THEIR POLITICAL 
ORGANIZATIONS AND NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATIONS 

THAT'S HOW WE HAVE MET THE CHALLENGES OF THE LAST FOUR YEARS. 
AND THAT'S HOW WE'LL MEET THE CHALLENGES OF THE FUTURE: 
TOGETHER. 

SAN FRANCISCO IS A CITY WHERE ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE. IT IS A CITY THAT 
HAS RISEN NOT ONCE, BUT TWICE, FROM THE ASHES OF AN EARTHQUAKE. 

IT IS A CITY BUILT ON A CAN-DO SPIRIT AND A CITY THAT EMBRACES AND 
CELEBRATES TOLERANCE AND DIVERSITY 

WHEN PEOPLE ASK ME WHAT IT THE BEST PART ABOUT BEING MAYOR OF 
SAN FRANCISCO, THE ANSWER COMES QUICKLY TO ME. IT'S THE PEOPLE. 

THE OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE AS YOUR MAYOR HAS BEEN THE HIGHEST 
PRIVILEGE OF MY PUBLIC LIFE. 

THANK YOU. 




I 

'tf/oo 



JVIayor Willie L. Brown, Jr's 
STATE OF THE CITY SERVICES 

October 23, 2000 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 
APR - 9 20C) 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Administrative Services 

• Established a 10-car, altemative-fuel vehicle pool at 
City Hall and has been operating since October 2, 
2000. 

• Established a Minimum Compensation and Labor 
Standards Enforcement Office to monitor all City 
contracts. 

• Created new vote count system for Elections Office 
to produce precinct results faster and more 
efficiently. 



Animal Care and Control 

• Nationally recognized as one of the model municipal 
animal control agencies in the country, with one of 
the highest live release rates in the U.S. - currently 
73%, compared to the national average of less than 
35%. 

• Started a S.I.S.T.E.R. program at the San Francisco 
County jail that gives incarcerated women exposure 
to job opportunities in animal care upon release. 

• Established a Safe Pets Program where the agency 
provides emergency sheltering for family pets in 
circumstances where women are at risk of being 
battered. 



(Arts Commission Con't) 

• Brought San Francisco's world-famous symphony 
orchestra into the open air through its annual free 
outdoor concert at Stem Grove, conducted this year 
by Bobby McFerrin. 

• Working with the Department of Public Works and 
the San Francisco Prize Coalition, held an 
international design competition for a redesign of 
Harvey Milk Plaza. 

• Renewing historic monuments, including the City's 
210-year-old, 3,000-lb. bronze Buddha, scheduled to 
return to the Japanese Tea Garden this fall, and Nob 
Hill's Fountain of the Tortoises, returning to 
Huntington Park in early 2001. 



Children, Youth and Families (MCYF) 

• Created a Children's Cabinet, a coordinated strategic 
planning effort among department heads to improve 
services for children and youth. 

• Implemented a stipend program that promotes the 
retention of child care teachers, providers, and 
directors who have made a commitment to their 
child care careers through education and training 
(S.F. CARES). 



Art Commission 

• Through the Mayor's Office, allocated $657,000 
from the general fund reserve to salvage SFUSD's 
elementary arts program, allowing every young San 
Franciscan in public school to continue in music, 
dance, painting and other arts subjects. 

• Allocated $1.5 million in Cultural Equity Grants to 
San Francisco multicultural artists and arts 
organizations, empowering them to continue 
presenting unique community-based dance 
performances, exhibitions, workshops, festivals and 
other arts. 



Department of Human Services (DHS) 

• Since the CalWORKs Program began in April 1998, 
2,415 families have left cash assistance and found 
employment. The average hourly wage of families 
who left cash assistance due to employment is 
$10.15. 

• An additional 2,300 families are employed while on 
cash aid and enrolled in the department's post- 
employment services. 



(DHS Con't) 



(Environment Con't) 



The State of California's noncompliance order has 
been lifted from City's child welfare and foster care 
program. 

Decreased first-time entries into foster care by 26% 
while they have been increasing statewide over the 
same period. 

Increased the number of children being reunified 
with their parents by 27%. 

According to a report from the State Legislative 
Analyst's Office, San Francisco's level of 
performance in child protection ranks second in the 
state. 



information on how to make your home more energy 
and resource efficient, and highlights the City's 
environmental efforts. EcoCenter will also provide 
environmental education and outreach programs. 

Working with Muni to develop plans to switch from 
diesel to clean-burning alternative fuels. 

Won a SI 3 million "environmental justice" grant to 
address neighborhood arising from the sale and 
possible expansion of the Potrero Hill power plant 
and community infrastructure needs arising from the 
shutdown of the Hunters Point power plant. 

Facilitated the purchase of 30 CNG-fueled taxicabs 
that serve San Francisco and the Airport. 



DTIS (Telecommunication Services) 

• Provided webcasting of government cable 
programming and offered video on demand via the 
Internet . 

• CityWatch won the "Overall Excellence in 
Community Media" Award from Alliance for 
Community Media. 



Environment 

• Working to save Ocean Beach, the largest stretch of 
sandy beach in San Francisco and home to a wealth 
of plants and animals native to the Bay Area. 

• Reduced the City's overall pesticide and herbicide 
use by more than 50% and have eliminated the use 
of products containing the most dangerous 
ingredients. 

• Used corn meal mulch and torches to keep weeds 
down in City parks, released mosquito-eating 
microorganisms in City ponds and cockroach-eating 
geckos in the Conservatory of Flowers, and used a 
heard of 400 goats to manage weeds at Hetch 
Hetchy. 

• Opened the City's first "green building," housing the 
new offices of the Department of the Environment 
and an environmental information center. 

• The EcoCenter is open to the public. It showcases 
the latest in green building technology, offers 



Fire 

• Began nationwide search for new chief. 

• Dedicated $4.9 million for hiring and training 144 
new firefighters. 



Grants for the Arts 

• Funded a study of the facility needs of the City's 
non-profit arts and cultural organizations, funded a 
new website for information and technical assistance 
(www.orgspaces.org ') and developed a pool of $1.5 
million in loans and grants to explore space 
acquisition, renovation, co-location and other space 
issues. 

• Granted a total of $11.6 million to support 217 of 
San Francisco's diverse non-profit arts and cultural 
organizations. 

• Launched a capital equipment initiative with 
$250,000 to help community-based arts 
organizations acquire equipment for shared use. 



Human Rights Commission 

• Certified more than 2,800 City contractors now 
offering domestic partner benefits. These contractors 
employ approximately 1,384,000 people and are 
located in 44 states and 800 cities across the country. 



Mayor's Office on Disability 

• Created one year ago, the office has helped in 
making the new Pacific Bell Park and the new 
airport facility the most accessible in the world, as 
well as improving the accessibility to Coit Tower 
and Pioneer Park. 

• Working to make all 27 branch libraries fully 
accessible. 



Mayor's Office of Homelessness 

• Deployed eight multidisciplinary teams throughout 
the City to make contact with homeless people, 
merchants and other constituents; attend to mental 
and physical health problems; and provide referrals 
to available resources. 

• Opened a new homeless shelter for youth, the Lark- 
Inn shelter, for youth ages 18-24. 

• Will open a new 154-bed family shelter at 260 
Golden Gate in December. Services will include 24- 
hour staffing, case management, counseling, 
children's activities programs, permanent housing 
search assistance and three meals a day. 

• Making available storage capacity for homeless 
adults at 150 Otis Street and in other existing 
facilities. 

• Will conduct the second Homeless Count, to 
accurately assess the numbers of homeless 
individuals on the streets, in shelters and elsewhere 
for better planning and policymaking. 

• Expanded the Mobile Assistance Patrol services for 
homeless families, and opened the first of three new 
neighborhood-based drop-in centers for homeless 
adults with laundry, showers, counseling, storage 
lockers, voice mail, and access to other city services. 

• Expanded the Masterlease SRO Hotels Program to 
include seven hotels encompassing 912 rooms, with 
enhanced support services on-site including medical 
teams, crisis intervention, property management, 
case management and tenant activities. 



(MOH Con't) 

• Opened the 70-bed Hamilton Family Center for 
formerly homeless families in the Haight-Ashbury, 
Veterans Academy (100 beds) at the Presidio 
Campus, and Britton Street Family Apartments (92 
units) in Visitacion Valley. 

• Began construction on John King Senior Housing 
(91 units) and Heritage Family Homes (148 units) in 
Visitacion Valley, Church Street Family Apartments 
(93 units), Preservation Senior Housing (91 units) in 
the Tenderloin, and Bemal Gateway (56 units) in 
Bernal Heights. 

• Have in the pipeline 104 new family units in 
Visitacion Valley; Howard Street Senior Housing 
(85 units) in the South of Market; a planned South of 
Market development with 161new units for families 
and single persons; and the La Playa Apartments (14 
units) in the Richmond. 

• Breaking ground on the first affordable family 
housing development in Mission Bay, the Orlando 
Cepeda Common, featuring 100 low-income rental 
units, a childcare center, a computer learning center 
and community space. 

• Created three major affordable rental developments- 
totaling 331 units, a multi-service community center 
four childcare centers and a senior center-in 
Visitacion Valley. Also invested an additional S16 
million to create new childcare centers, a senior 
center, neighborhood parks, as well as children, 
youth and senior programs, in response to the 
demolition of Geneva Towers and lack of 
community services in the Visitacion Valley 
neighborhood. 

• Saved nearly 1,000 units of low- income rental 
housing from being sold and converted to market 
rate housing upon expiration of HUD affordability 
restrictions 

• Assisted in the acquisition of 1,200 units in 10 
projects under the preservation program, leveraging 
$15 million in local funds to attract SI 15 million in 
private funds to purchase and rehab these units. 



Mayor's Office of Housing (MOH) 

• Completed and began construction or have in the 
pipeline 2,271 affordable housing units and 329 beds 
in group housing since last October. 



Since October 1999, assisted 190 households to 
become homeowners. 



(MOH Con't) 

• Assisted low- and moderate-income first-time 
homebuyers with City downpayment assistance that 
was increased from $50,000 to $100,000 per 
homebuyer. 

• Have affordable housing developments in the 
pipeline for the elderly and disabled. 

• Rehabbed 96 vacant units at Treasure Island for 
formerly homeless families and individuals who will 
also receive comprehensive support services, and 
will increase number to 218 units. 

• Will develop up to 700 units of housing on State- 
owned parcels on Octavia Boulevard that will be 
transferred to the City in December. 

• Working with SFUSD for construction on a new 
financing program that will significantly increase 
first-time homeownership opportunities for public 
school teachers at low performing schools. 



Moscone Center 

• Awarded contract for construction of Moscone 
West, which will add 50% more exhibit and meeting 
space to the Moscone Center, which is currently 
operating at capacity. 

• Moscone Center's recycling program diverted 1 
million pounds of materials from the waste stream 
and donated 60,000 pounds of food to SF non- 
profits. 



Municipal Railway Agency 

• Expanded the F-Line to Fisherman's Wharf. 

• Provided outstanding service to Pacific Bell Park. 

• Improved schedule reliability, particularly on Metro. 

• Began implementation of Prop. E through new 
driver contract. 

• Began construction of 3rd Street Light Rail Project. 

• Expanded service to South of Market. 



Police 

• Opened Tenderloin Task Force Center and Police 
Station. 

• Dedicated $9.5 million for equipment and 
technology for patrol fleet computer systems, the 
crime lab and the new 911 system. 



Office of Public Finance 

• Upgraded City's Standard & Poor rating from AA- 
to solid AA. 

• Leveraged City rental funds to accrue equity 
ownership of office space used by City and City- 
funded non-profits. 

Public Health 

• Implementing last year's $299 million bond 
initiative to rebuild 1,200 skilled nursing beds at 
Laguna Honda Hospital and provide an additional 
140 units for assisted living. 

• Rehabilitated three residential hotels, targeting 
chronically homeless people. 

• Opening three new facilities to provide an additional 
150 units of community-based housing, specifically 
designed to reduce the homeless' reliance on 
institutional care. 

• Opened 330 new treatment on demand slots (2,154 
treatment on demand slots, providing over 15,000 
client contacts, since 1996). 

• Developing four new treatment on demand 
programs, for individual in jail, African-Americans, 
Samoan families and Asian women 

• Opened two new treatment on demand detoxification 
programs. 



Public Works 

• Continued to convene Quality of Life/Neighborhooc 
Forums that focus on improving city services. 

• Established Street Construction Coordination Centei 
that minimizes the impact of street construction or 
the public. 



(Public Works Con't) 



(PUC Con't) 



• Began 24-hour, seven-day-a-week, street cleaning 
operation. (Call 28-CLEAN to report trash and 
graffiti.) 

• Established monthly district-by-district cleaning 
efforts focusing on four straight Saturdays, (week 1: 
general cleanup; week 2: graffiti removal; week 3: 
clean up of open spaces; week 4: cleanup around 
public buildings.) 

• Reduced the number of blocks excavated by 40% in 
the past year. 

• Undergrounded over three miles of utility lines with 
another 1 .75 miles to go. 

• Planted 3,000 trees in neighborhoods and along 
major thoroughfares. 

• Installed three more automatic public toilets (Twin 
Peaks, the Mission, the Castro) with one coming to 
Pioneer Park. 

• Completed $50 million Mid-Embarcadero project 
ahead of schedule. 

• Renovated the Lefty O'Doul (3 rd Street) Bridge in 
time for the opening of Pacific Bell Ballpark. 

• Building Oceanview branch library. 

• Renovating Japantown Peace Plaza. 

• Renovating Richmond Community Center. 

• Building new Chinatown Park Playground. 

• Started renovation of Pioneer Park. 

• Started new Moscone Center building. 

• Started Conservatory of Flowers restoration. 



Public Utilities Commission (PUC) 

• Completed Water Supply Master Plan that charts a 
course for the development of additional water 
supply sources and construction of facilities to meet 
demand through 2030. 



Initiated major infrastructure projects such as the 
Crystal Springs #1 Replacement Project and the 
Santa Clara Intertie Project. 

Sold surplus property to create revenue streams 
outside of the retail rate base. 



Sheriff Department 

• Negotiated and funded a contract to build a 
replacement facility for County Jail #3, ending years 
of federal litigation over conditions at the oldest 
operating jail in California. 



Solid Waste Management Program 

• Diverted 42.9% of City waste in 1999, the highest 
diversion percentage ever for the San Francisco. 

• Implemented the Resource Conservation Ordinance, 
which requires every City Department to create and 
implement a recycling plan. 

• Granted more than $600,000 to community groups 
for creative recycling projects, ranging from 
salvaging computers for schools and low-income 
families to composting at the Presidio National Park 
to redistributing food to low-income seniors. 

• Collected more than 4,500 mercury thermometers in 
an effort to remove mercury from San Francisco 
homes. 

• Received the Cal/EPA 2000 "Program Excellence" 
award for residential, small business and City 
department hazardous waste programs. 

• By December, will make free curbside pick-up of 
used oil, oil filters and latex paint available to all 
residents. 



Transbay Terminal 

• Planning a 600,000 square-ft., five-level facility with 
transit and retail uses, plus 5.7 million square feet of 
mixed-use joint developments on the adjacent 
parcels. 



(Transbay Terminal Con't) 

• Working to bring rail across the Bay, as the voters of 
San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and Emeryville 
approved in 1988. 

• Freeing up enough land to develop 2,500-3,000 new 
housing units. 



Recreation and Park 

• Issued bonds for major capital improvement 
campaign, to renovate Mission Playground 
Clubhouse; acquire natural areas such as Hawk Hill 
and Edgehill Mountain, re-landscape the Randall 
Museum and build new Oceanview Park and 
Recreation Center. 

• Completed work on Macauley Playground. 

• Collaborating with various partners to renovate 
basketball courts and playing fields, such as the new 
Nate Thurmond Basketball Courts in the Panhandle. 



Redevelopment Agency 

• Facilitated the retention of 969 units of rental 
housing at risk of converting to market rate housing. 
Overall, the preservation program has retained 
nearly 1,200 units in 10 developments through out 
San Francisco. 

• After 13 years of planning and negotiating, 
transferred property to the federal government for 
the purpose of constructing a federal office building 
for 3,000 employees at 7th and Mission Streets. 

• Facilitated the last publicly sponsored projects 
associated with the redevelopment of Yerba Buena 
Gardens, including a 375-space underground garage 
next to St. Patrick's Church, a public plaza on top of 
the garage, the Mexican Museum and an African- 
American museum at 3rd and Mission Streets. 



Rent Board 

• Completely eliminated backlog of petitions for the 
first time in several years. 



II 




DOCUMENTS DEP- 

Mayor Willie L. Brown, Jr's 

STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS 

October 22, 2001 



Mayor Brown: Thank you very much for that kind introduction. Members of the 

board and other San Franciscans, thank you for your very warm 
reception. 

September 1 1 changed this nation in a very dramatic way. I would 
ask that we stand in a moment of silence for all those persons who 
lost their lives or had their families disrupted on the 1 1 th of 
September. 

[30-second pause] 

Thank you very much. 

On the occasion of this year's State of the City Address, I'd like to 
first acknowledge the elected official family of San Francisco, most 
of which is represented here today: Assessor Doris Ward, Treasurer 
Susan Leal, Public Defender Kimiko Burton Cruz, City Attorney 
Louise Renne, Sheriff Michael Hennessey - who walked in with us 
- and District Attorney Terrence Hallinan. You also noticed 
walking in with us were some other persons, including, of course 
our new Fire chief, the man who handled the matter that I will 
discuss in a moment, Mario Trevino - a man who's been handling 
some very serious matters since September 1 1 th , on an almost 24- 
hour basis. 

Along with the Chief were airport director John Martin, who's had 
a tough job of late, and a man who has become our official 
spokesperson where there's any issue of concern with reference to 
the health and the physical welfare of the citizens of this city, or 
anything bioterrorism, Public Health Director Mitch Katz, as well 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 2 



as a new addition to my administration, Patricia Martell, the new 
director of the Public Utilities Commission 



Clerk: 



Mayor Brown: 



And of course the people who are the principal defender of public 
safety in this city. They are led by the Chief of Police, Fred Lau. I 
attended a service recently where Chief Lau and his command staff 
acknowledged some outstanding officers who had done some 
magnificent things. I extended an invitation of those offices to 
come to this occasion, and I'd love to have them stand. Madame 
Clerk, if you can take and read this series of names, and we'll have 
each one of these law officers stand, and you will identify exactly 
what their medal happens to be, please. 

Honorable Mayor . . . bronze medal of valor: Officer Ricardo 
Valdez. Silver medals of valor: Sergeant David Hamilton, Sergeant 
William Scott, Officer Steven Murphy, Officer Paul Lozada, 
Officer Stephen Paulsen, Officer Edith Lewis, Officer Michael 
Alexander, Officer Steven Maionchi. Metal valor awards: Gold 
medal of Valor, Officer Joseph Juarez, Officer Jesus Pena, Officer 
Ian Furminger, Officer Jason Sawyer. Purple Heart award: Officer 
Kenneth Koenig. 

[applause] 

In each case, it was either saving someone else's life or exercising 
other forms of heroics that resulted in a greater level of public 
safety for the people of this city, and they should be appropriately 
acknowledged. 

I must also tell you, this is one of the few times that the State of the 
City Address has been given and school board trustees have 
attended. I had a great visit with Mary Hernandez, one of the 
elected school board members, who advised me with great sadness 
that tomorrow night she will resign from the school board; that she 
and her family have found it necessary to follow an opportunity for 
employment for her husband - so she'll be moving to Carlsbad. As 
of Wednesday, she'll be leaving the school board. In my 
discussions with her, it was obviously an emotional moment, but 
one which I thought we ought to acknowledge today in terms of the 
incredible service she has provided to the city. Of course, in my 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 3 



State of the City Address, I will tell you why I made that reference 
and what I intend to do as a result of it. 

She also informed me of something that I think is of special 
importance, and that is: Out of 160 students considered from all the 
student bodies throughout the State of California, at the high school 
level, one is selected by the governor and appointed to serve on the 
State Board of Education, to administer policies of all the schools of 
this state. The process is an incredible one. 160 students made it 
past the initial threshold. They then went through an elaborate 
process where that group was whittled down to a more manageable 
level of about 12. That 12 then went through additional 
proceedings and that number was reduced to three. 

Finally, the governor's individual staff reviewed the three. They all 
had outstanding qualities, but the one that had the most outstanding 
qualities, however, happens to be one of our own students here at a 
Gateway School. She, too is here today. Erica Gonzalez, please 
stand. 

[applause] 

I think it would be appropriate for the Board of Supervisors to 
prepare a resolution acknowledging her single achievement, and 
I've asked that you do it in time for her appointment, if you would. 
I think she deserves that single honor. 

There are some other special people who are here on this occasion. 
There are three people who work in the hotel industry in San 
Francisco: Ligia Altamirano, who works with Grand Hyatt, Brenda 
Chau with the St. Francis Hotel and Kevin White at the Holiday Inn 
Fisherman's Wharf. You'll hear me mention these individuals as I 
make my remarks. 

You'll also hear me mention Signature BioScience, Inc. The 
company's founder, John Hefti and two if his executives, Mark 
McDade and Nancy Pecoda are all here as part of special guests on 
this occasion. 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 4 



As I said, America, I think, has changed dramatically since the 1 1 th 
day of September. We in San Francisco have changed dramatically. 
The emphasis that this nation now places on security and safety is 
virtually unprecedented. Every sector of our population is keenly 
aware of the focused attention that is being paid to their safety. 

I must tell you I was very proud of the official family of San 
Francisco. On the morning of the 1 1 th , shortly after 8 a.m., almost 
every person who had been trained and gone through the process of 
ensuring the safety of this community were assembled at their 
assigned positions at the Office of Emergency Services. 

The Police and Fire were on top alert. The MUNI system had 
begun its process of assuring the safety of its passengers. The 
school district moved very quickly to begin the process of shutting 
down the schools and ensuring the safety of those students. Dr. 
Mitchell Katz in the Health Department had assumed the 
appropriate role to ensure that not only the public health facilities, 
but the private health facilities as well, were ready for whatever 
might come their way. 

The coordinating process with the state and the federal authorities 
was engaged also. The information system began to flow. 

It was an unprecedented day, and your Board of Supervisors, led by 
your board's vice president, Tom Ammiano, along Supervisors 
Hall, Leno, Maxwell and McGoldrick, were all a part of the team 
that, for several hours, stood shoulder to shoulder with all the 
respective department heads as we charted and thought how best to 
ensure the safety of this city, and how best to keep each one of you 
people in this city functioning. 

I'm speaking directly to the citizens of San Francisco: you should 
know that your leadership in this city did a magnificent job of 
ensuring that you were as safe as safe can be. 

Yes, for that one day, we did shut down the government in San 
Francisco. Each one of the landmarks were reinforced for safety 
purposes, and all of the private sector danger signs that could 
possibly be a target for terrorists were immediately addressed. It 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 5 



was, frankly, a great exercise. An exercise by people who've been 
honed and sensitized by the ever-present danger of earthquakes. 
We have lived with that fear in the city for a very long time - and 
note the word "live." We have not allowed that fear to control us. 

Likewise, on this occasion, San Franciscans should recognize the 
fear, but use the fear as a teaching device, use the fear as a means 
by which to erect the appropriate kinds of signals and responses that 
would allow you to proceed with caution - but the operating word 
is "proceed." 

San Francisco is in that kind of a position. We have done the job 
that we need to do, and we are continuing to do that job. Yes, 
we've been told by Washington, Sacramento and other places, "Go 
ahead and act normally, go back to your regular activities." They 
say that at the beginning of the morning, and then the remainder of 
the day, there's one announcement after another; ending usually in 
the day with, "There's always the possibility. ..." Terrorists win, if 
we begin to allow that to be the course and conduct of our lives. 

I want to use this occasion to have San Franciscans understand that 
our city is safe, that our city is secure, and that every step is being 
taken to ensure that security. Whether it's at the airport, where 
systems employed out there are equal if not superior to anyplace in 
the nation, we are secure. Those security measures were in place 
before September 1 1 , and they are in place even more aggressively 
now. We have baggage screeners who make the highest pay in the 
nation, benefits as well as wages. We have the highest retention of 
baggage screeners, and we have best training for such screeners. 

We were the first airport to say, "Yes, send the national guard. 
They can play a role in assisting with security." And of course, our 
police department had already been integrated with the airport 
police, so it's one unit under the command of Chief Lau. It's one 
unit for fire, under the command of Chief Trevino, and it's been 
that way. And so we are in as good a shape as you possibly get, 
from the standpoint of dealing with the issue of terrorism. 

Now, everyday, we hear more and more about something that most 
people have never heard of before, anthrax. People are coming 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 
Page 6 



forward, people are worried. I was at the barbershop the other day, 
and some kid walked up to me and said, "What's happening with 
this Amtrak scare and everybody?" Obviously, it is an issue. 

But let me be clear, so far there's been no evidence of any anthrax 
or other threat in the San Francisco Bay Area, or in San Francisco 
particularly. Let me also tell you that it isn't contagious. Let me 
remind you that you can't spread it from one person to another, that 
nowhere in the nation has anything been sent to anybody's 
household, that it's all been done by way of the mail process. It's 
not been delivered in any other fashion. It's readily treatable, not 
fatal, and is easily discoverable. 

Most of you do not know, but last Monday here at City Hall, one of 
our workers - who had been appropriately trained to deal with the 
mail, trained in the procedures set by the US Postal Service - 
received an envelope addressed to me, with unusual markings and 
characteristics, and she recognized it contained some substance. 
She did what she was told to do, and trained to do. She notified her 
supervisors immediately, and they got ahold of the appropriate 
authorities. Moments later Dr. Katz was here. So were the police 
department and the fire department. City Hall was immediately 
sealed in the way it should be sealed and the people who do the lab 
work at the federal government were called in. All of that was done 
lickity-split, so to speak, without any disruption to any of your lives 
and without adding any undue concern. 

It turned out, of course, to be a false alarm. 

Let me assure you, we want to be in a position to render the same 
quick, precise attention whenever there is some substance that you 
believe represents a problem. 

But let me ask you also to deal a little bit with reason. When you 
see next to your plate some white, powdery substance, do not 
immediately call 911. Think for a moment. That cookie you ate, 
may have produced the debris, [laughter] 

When you walk on the streets and you see white dust near a 
construction site, be alert, but think for a moment. Allow your 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 7 



senses tell you whether or not that's something you should really be 
concerned about. Don't ignore those things that you should really 
be concerned about, but don't become so panic-stricken that at 
every opportunity, you make the 91 1 call, because you're taxing the 
emergency system's resources. You're making it difficult for 
serious attention to be given to problems that are in fact serious, and 
you also allow yourself to develop in your heart the fear that the 
terrorists are trying to inflict. 

The terrorist succeeds when you become so enraptured in fear that 
you can't function. Then they have won. That's not the way we 
want San Francisco to be, and that is not the state of your city in 
terms of its leadership. 

Your city, this city . . . the weather is perfect. Your city is 
absolutely beautiful. Your city is meeting its challenges, and your 
city, as evidenced by the protestors this morning, is functioning as 
normal as it is ever, [laughter, applause] 

And you, the citizens of this city are encouraged to join that 
process. Because we ought to continue to enjoy being a part of 
what this city is all about. Be clear, we are, at the government 
level, focused on your safety and on your security. We will take 
every step necessary to ensure your safety and your security. 
Whether it's at the port, the airport, whether it's in the tunnels, 
whether it's on any street in San Francisco, in the schools, in the 
churches - you name it, we will provide you with the appropriate 
level of security that makes every word that I've said a reality for 
all of us in San Francisco. 

But enough about the physical security of San Francisco. Let's talk 
for a minute about what has also occurred in the city, and that is 
there's been a serious attack on the economy of this city. 

When we passed the city budget just three months ago, we were 
already in a downturn. The dot-com economy, so powerful the past 
few years, had become, even before September 1 1 th an absolute 
disaster. Every day, we were listening to another bankruptcy or 
another shutdown or another scale back or another series of layoffs 
of a talented workforce. Yes, we in the city were in the process of 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 8 



meeting that new challenge, because San Francisco has always been 
more than just a dot-com haven. San Francisco for many years had 
been anchored, in part, in tourism and travel. Yes, we were blessed, 
because even in very bad times, people wanted to enjoy themselves, 
and we as a city provided them a great opportunity. 

And then lo and behold, September 1 1 th rolls around. Whatever 
estimates that had been certified by our controller, in terms of the 
flow of revenues to the city, had to be re-adjusted, and not for the 
better. Because you see, the hotels were, after September 11', were 
down to the neighborhood of 30-35% occupancy. We were looking 
at one cancelled convention on our about September 1 1 th . A dental 
convention, a major operation for us in San Francisco, had to be 
cancelled. Air travel was down. And you know, travelers gain 
access to the city, for tourism purposes, for travel purposes, for 
hotel occupancy purposes, by over 80% by way of air. No air, no 
hotel guests, and that was devastating. 

We responded very quickly. First, to reopen the airports. Our 
airport was one of the very first to be reopened. Secondly, our 
Convention and Business Bureau went to work to make sure that 
those persons who had booked conventions for the future were not 
backing away from what they intended to do. I must tell you and 
report to you, not one convention of any appreciable size, I am told, 
has been cancelled. Yes, there has been some reduced attendance, 
but even today I can report to you that that trend's going in the 
opposite direction. 

But I must also tell you that the incredible days of yesteryear - and 
that was just last year - when hotels were looking at 82-83% 
occupancy on a regular basis, when people were having to scramble 
to find a room, well, that's no longer the case. But they are, in fact, 
back in the 60% category, and they anticipate hovering somewhere 
between 60 and 70% for the year. That's a plus for us, because the 
hotel tax means a lot to the general fund, the airport means a lot to 
the general fund. 

Yes, the room rates will probably be somewhat reduced. But that, 
too, is the reality of this new economy, and we had anticipated even 
that. The restaurants that, more often than not, feed the hotel guests 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 
Page 9 



are looking at a 20-25% reduction. The cab drivers are being hit 
just as hard. So, in all of those categories, we must be challenged to 
be responsive. 

And we are being responsive. Just as San Franciscans needed an 
opportunity to meet together, just as you needed an opportunity to 
reach out, just as you neede an opportunity to talk to somebody 
about what you felt on September 1 1 th -just as we put together a 
day of remembrance over at Bill Graham Auditorium, a clear faith- 
based opportunity to express ourselves and be involved - that 
process must be engaged in as it relates to the service industry and 
the travel industry, and we're doing that. 

We've had two meetings here at City Hall, in which we've pulled in 
people from all those perspective places. We've even had the 
benefit of two of the members of the board of supervisors, so far. 
And others who have indicated a desire to participate. Supervisor 
Newsom and Supervisor Peskin have been involved. Supervisor 
Ammiano has been involved. And there are other supervisors 
who've expressed their desire to participate. People from the 
merchant community, people from the hotel industry, Hotel 
Council. People from small business, people from the 
neighborhood businesses, people from organized labor, all of them 
have gotten involved . . . And speaking of organized labor, the three 
people I've mentioned who work at hotels in San Francisco, of the 
three, Kevin [White] has been laid off post 9/11. Brenda's hours 
have been cut back. Clearly, a decisive hit on that family income. 
And of course, [Latia] has virtually had her income wiped out, 
because hers is down to about 15 hours a week. And in each of 
those categories, these are people who live in San Francisco. These 
are people who had good jobs, working 40 hours a week and 
making good wages. They're now taking home unemployment 
insurance and that's it. That will not cut it for the people who work 
in this city. 

Organized labor gave us the report that they're trying to raise a half 
million dollars, that they've restructured some of their contracts and 
their relationships, in order to keep health care benefits for the next 
six months for their members who have lost their benefits. And 
they are looking to raise a half million dollars to help out in other 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 
Page 10 



ways. We are pledging ourselves - my office, and I hope you'll 
join us - in the effort to see that we raise that half-million dollars, 
see that the hotel workers that are so vital to our delivery system get 
the assistance that they will appropriately need. 

Yes, unemployment insurance benefits are being expended, 
according to Gray Davis and his office, and they will do their best 
to see that it happens. At the Washington level, Barbara Boxer, 
Dianne Feinstein, and now Nancy Pelosi in a leadership position, 
afford us an opportunity to make the case, and we will be making 
the case, that unemployment benefits ought to continue until such 
time that unemployment drops something below 5% in any given 
community in America. There should not be a cap. If either of the 
three people I mentioned loses that $124 benefit, all of their income 
is gone. That would be a sad tale, a sad story. 

We're taking other steps, because the retail people are hit in the 
same way. We had a golden opportunity provided by an artist 
named Craig Frasier, just recently. He gave us the design for a 
sign, a poster. If you read this morning's Wall Street Journal, you'll 
notice that our "America: Open for Business" sign is in the Wall 
Street Journal. And, along with it, a story about how the fashion 
world intends to use the kind of thing that we're doing here in San 
Francisco as a means to rekindle people's interest in spending. 
We're doing even better. To go with the 15,000 signs which we 
have distributed and put in businesses all around San Francisco, 
we're now putting together a program, from the 1 1 th to the 17 th of 
November, where any of those businesses that have that sign will 
afford you a discount, a good deal, or just a warm welcome, if you 
show up and do business with them. 

We're also putting together, at no cost to the city, a program where 
telephone calls will be made to about 1.2 million people in the San 
Francisco Bay Area and around Northern California, for the express 
purpose of urging them to come shop, stay overnight in San 
Francisco and eat in our restaurants. Because, you see, air traffic 
has not picked up sufficiently. It's only back to maybe 50%. And 
John Martin tells me that during the course of the year, it probably 
isn't going to go any higher than 60 or 70% of what it was, and that 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 1 1 



the people flying now are not spending, per person, as much as they 
normally spent. 

So, we've got to get the drivers to come into San Francisco. 
Therefore, we've got to make a major outreach effort - and we are 
doing exactly that. And that's what "America: Open For Business" 
is all about. And I must tell you, and now that it's been mentioned 
in the Wall Street Journal, it's like a light went off in everybody's 
head: suddenly, the printers and others who have been so kind to 
agree to do the 15,000 posters for free, they're now putting together 
a package of 1 million, so we can distribute them all over the 
nation. The mayor's offices all over this country are being given 
the opportunity to have "America: Open For Business" sent to 
them, so that they too can accomplish a part of what we're doing — 

[applause] 

This is San Francisco doing its number, in order to make sure that 
we've got something going. But let me tell you, friends in this 
chamber, we cannot let just that kind of effort to be the only thing; 
because the business world looks at San Francisco in ways that 
aren't addressed simply a sign saying we're open for business. 

Before I became mayor, there was the assumption that San 
Francisco was hostile to business. That assumption went right out 
the window. I've suffered some criticism as a result of that 
assumption going out the window. It went out the window when 
out of the ground came 101 Mission. It went out the window when 
out of the ground came the W Hotel. It went out the window when, 
in fact, PacBell Park was built. It went out the window when any 
number of the new construction projects that are currently under 
way began to get approved. It went out the window when we began 
to have Doris Ward reassess and reevaluate the properties of this 
city, and they became incredibly valuable. I'll talk a little bit more 
about that in a minute. 

That business of saying San Francisco is open for business caused 
lots of people to want to invest. Every time one of those so-called 
signature companies left San Francisco, there was somebody to step 
right in, and offer even higher-paying jobs. Consequently, our 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 12 



unemployment dropped to something under 3%. We were in great 
shape. But the dot-com crisis and the people who left created a 
huge vacancy. It wasn't September 1 1 th , but the absence of the dot- 
com business that hit us on the real estate side. So we have an 
incredible amount of space now, commercial space now. There is a 
great fear that that commercial space will remain vacant for a very 
long time, causing Doris to have to go back and reduce the value of 
those properties, in view of the fact that they will not be 
contributing to the system. 

No, that has not occurred yet, because there is still optimism in the 
real estate community. They're not going to get the astronomical 
rates that they were once getting, but they will be able to fill it with 
something. What is that something? The one-seventh of the US 
economy that has not been touched in an adverse way, has not been 
hurt, but in fact has been boosted, is the world of biotechnology. 

Some of us struggled really hard to convince the University of 
California to place its second campus here in San Francisco. Yeah, 
they wanted to go to Brisbane, they wanted to go to Alameda. They 
wanted to go to some of the other so-called ideal spots, because 
they did not believe San Francisco would afford them the 
opportunity to do the marvelous, incredible research that can be 
done - research that might one day produce a cure for AIDS, 
produce a cure for cancer, or produce pharmaceutical products that 
are now in demand in view of the so-called bioterrorism threat. 

Well, we convinced the University of California to put its facility 
there. It's now in the process of building five structures. The 
people who are developing Mission Bay are building one structure 
for biotech purposes. Five million square feet in space is scheduled 
to be built there. Well, we have lots of space already, and it's space 
that the dot-coms abandoned. We can make that space readily 
available on an aggressive basis to this new world of bio- 
technology, and give them an opportunity to exploit the clustered, 
incredible collection of universities that are here in this region. To 
give them the opportunity to move from the East Bay and from 
South San Francisco into a more pleasant environment, for the 
purpose of, in fact, working their marvels of science. 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 13 



You know that the federal government is going to provide lots of 
money for research in that area. You know that the pharmaceutical 
world is going to provide lots of money for research in that area. 
This incredible, well-trained workforce that we have, that's already 
technologically capable and confident, and the incredible number of 
universities that we have, can provide that component. It's a natural 
marriage, and with the space, we can make progress. 

And progress we are making, because there's a second story in 
today's Wall Street Journal. It says, in glowing terms, "San 
Francisco is open for business." Because Signature BioScience, 
Inc., the people that I mentioned earlier, have decided to move their 
office over from Hayward to San Francisco. Searching around the 
area, they needed 65,000 square feet for their various activities. 
They're moving to San Francisco, bringing with them 150 
employees. They signed a 10-year lease in my office this morning 
with SKS Properties for the purpose of moving their facility to San 
Francisco. That is a plus to this city, because it is a signal to others 
in the industry that they can come to our city. 

[applause] 

Yes, we are open for business and, I hope, as a Board you will join 
me in trying to make sure that at every step, when we have such a 
wonderful opportunity to exploit the incredible minds and the 
intellect that is here, we will take full advantage of it. And we 
should use the space that exists, as well as the space that is 
ultimately to come on line. 

Let me also tell you that the business of doing business in San 
Francisco still requires us to produce lots and lots of housing. Yes, 
the State of California has given us a golden opportunity. We can, 
almost instantly begin the process of building something on those 
Central Freeway sites that have been transferred to us from the 
state. I hope you will assist us. 

And let me tell you, I'm moving in a different direction, and I want 
you to come with me. I want the San Francisco Redevelopment 
Agency to become not just a financing agency for affordable 
housing ... I want the Redevelopment Agency of our city to go into 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 14 



the business of building affordable housing. I think they can do it 
quicker. I think they can do it more cost-effectively, and there will 
be no question about whether it would be affordable, because there 
would be no opportunity for anybody to make a profit from it in the 
process. I think we have an opportunity to do that with those sites 
that have come to us from CalTrans. 

I think we may also have a similar opportunity with the Transbay 
Terminal. I am in the process of negotiating with the Davis 
administration - all of their belly-aching about not giving us the 
property free, as they did with the Central Freeway parcels. But I'm 
suggesting to them, "Give it to us, let us develop it, and if any 
money is made from it, you get the money." I believe that kind of 
an arrangement can be made, and that facility will be a triggering 
device for economic development in this city. I say that because all 
of those development opportunities represent a continuation of the 
construction trade jobs, represent a continuation for architects and 
engineers, represent a continuation for those who do environmental 
reports and for all the people who do all the planning. 

All of that comes with the business of making sure that we are 
doing things that are environmentally sensitive and appropriate for 
the city. And I want to see us do that, as we go about trying to 
ensure the economic health of our city. We absolutely must do that, 
simultaneously. 

[applause] 

We must keep this city in a position where people are still interested 
in coming here, not just for development purposes, but for all the 
other reasons that people usually come to this city. And I saw, just 
a few days ago, where there's no city in America, Mr. President, 
that's known as a bilingual city. Everything we do in this town is 
bilingual. We do senior centers - multiple languages. We do a 
ballot - multiple languages. Our schools - multiple languages. 
Matter of fact, the young lady I referred to earlier who became a 
member of the state board was born in Brazil; came here speaking 
only Portuguese when she was 10 years of age. She went through 
the process of our bilingual programs, and by the time she got to the 
eighth grade, she was ready to go into the regular classes, and 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 15 



graduated with honors in English, and now speaks four or five 
different languages. 

Almost every youngster of Asian descent in this city speaks 
multiple languages. I don't know any place in the world that could 
be better identified as a bilingual city than San Francisco. As I go 
off to China in three or four days for one of our trade missions, I 
want to be able to advertise the fact that hence forward, this city 
will be known as a bilingual city, among other things. Mr. 
President, I will ask you to introduce this resolution at the Board, in 
both of our names. 

[applause] 

These challenges associated with the economic safety of San 
Francisco can be met by us if we work together. That is the key. 
Whether it's affordable housing, whether it's the business of the 
environment, whether it's the business of the Port, whether it's the 
business of a power plant, whether it's the business of building the 
Third Street Light Rail, whether it's the business of developing the 
Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard and all the much needed housing out 
there, whether it's the business relating to the Trust for The 
Presidio, whether it's the business of developing Treasure Island, 
and utilizing it - all of those represent opportunities for us to really 
ensure, and redirect, the economic health of this city and the 
economic safety of this city. 

We should no longer allow ourselves to be at risk with just tourism 
and travel as our basis for existing. 

[applause] 

I want implore those here to meet that challenge, to ensure the 
economic safety of our city. 

And then finally, I want to address the management of our city from 
a financial standpoint. Yes, we did pass the budget, and that budget 
was balanced, and it had an appropriate surplus. But on the advice 
of Budget Director Ben Rosenfield and others, we're looking at 
some different projections and some different numbers. 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 
Page 16 



Starting September 12, we challenged each department to look 
more deeply and re-examine their spending. We know that any 
time there is a crisis and the economy changes downward, revenues 
always go down and the demand for service goes up. That's a 
natural process in almost every municipality in this nation. 
Understanding that, we said to all the respective departments, we 
don't want any grandstanding. We're not going to make any 
speeches about 15% cuts across the board, we're not going to make 
any speeches about massive layoffs. We don't have to make any 
speeches about freezing employment. I want you to do what you've 
done for the last six years - this administration's life - and that's 
make intelligent, appropriate decisions. 

Because you see, the management that we have engaged in, 
individually and collectively in this city, has stood us in good 
standing. Just last week, when 32 different counties were looked at 
by the rating agency Moody's, they came away with the sad news 
that 31 of those counties had to be downgraded. Only one . . . only 
one was not touched, and it was San Francisco. 

It was not touched because at no point have we engaged in a 
spending binge, rooted in these artificial income scrapings that 
came from the so-called "new economy." We have been very 
careful to make sure that whenever new money came, it went not 
for the commencement of new programs, but it went for 
infrastructure investment: New buses for Muni, the whole business 
of the streetscape improvements on Ocean Avenue, for Laguna 
Honda Hospital. We have been very careful not to root any of our 
spending toward an artificial, unreliable place in space. Moody's 
saw that and proceeded to opine that San Francisco should not be 
downgraded. 

Yes, John Martin's got a problem at the airport. He's looking at 
probably a 25-30% drop in revenues, somewhere in the 
neighborhood of $100 million dollars. He's got to adjust. That 
means the service fee that he normally pays the general fund of San 
Francisco will not be forthcoming, unless somehow the airport is 
resurrected from the standpoint of people doing business with the 
airport. 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 

Page 17 



He's trying to manage that. His 1,500 employees, there may be 
some that he may have to uproot. But unlike United Airlines, 
unlike the air industry in total, there are no wholesale furloughs, no 
wholesale layoffs, no wholesale terminations. There are 
adjustments that are going on with the airport, in a way that makes 
sense. 

And our city government, the city departments, when we gave them 
the challenge that John Martin's struggling with publicly, they came 
back to us and said yes, we can do it. And you members of this 
board will be pleased, when Ben comes to you after this State of the 
City Address and walks through with you the various ways in which 
the departments intend to readjust their management process, 
readjust their spending program, I think you will be pleased. And it 
will be without layoffs, and in most cases without any cutbacks in 
services. 

Let me also assure you, I said I don't want any fights with this 
board. So those ideas I've outlined are now on the table for 
consideration. The ad backs which you put in the budget, and we 
left in the budget, are all still there, untouched. If you want to do 
something with them, you can. But the way in which we have 
computed our strategy, it will not be necessary. We're at the stage 
where we can see $60-100 million of a difference on the spending 
side. And $60-100 million difference on the income side. That 
means that without touching the surplus, we are in a position to 
manage our City in budgetary balance. 

I need two things from you, however. The 911 fee process is not as 
comprehensive as it needs to be for use - not the amount assessed, 
but the ability to use the money in various ways. I'm going to ask 
Supervisor Aaron Peskin to carry the legislation that will allow us 
the opportunity to do that, to expand the use of the 911 fee 
revenues. 

Then I'm going to shock my appointees to the War Memorial 
Board, because they've been hoarding money to rebuild the 
Veteran's Building facility that was formerly the temporary City 
Hall. There is about $10-12 million in hotel tax money that will be 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 
Page 18 



there for years to come as they go about trying to put together $1 50 
million dollars for that purpose. I'm going to them, and I'm sure 
they'll cooperate by supplying the city with about $7 million, so it 
can go back to the general fund, on the condition that when things 
reverse themselves and any new income coming into the hotel tax 
fund goes back to the War Memorial, to replace the $7 million 
that's been moved for the purposes of dealing with this issue. 

There are no other great sacrifices that will have to be made by 
anybody. When Mitch Katz can find a way to shave $5 million 
from his budget without interfering with the health delivery system 
of the City, at least on a one-time basis, you know the others can do 
it. And they are currently looking at each one of the items in their 
budgets, and making decisions. When even the police department 
and the fire department are able to contribute to the effort - 
although the incredible expense the police department incurred 
today on that ill-conceived demonstration, represents, always, a 
threat to their participating in this budgetary process. 

But if we could manage the city the way we have done in the past, it 
will not be necessary to ever have Moody's, or anybody else, 
challenge us. Because, you see, part of what would keep us solid 
will be the approval that the voters have given us toward 
expenditures. The voters said spend $299 on Laguna Honda. The 
voters said spend more than $100 million to restore public parks, 
and build new parks, and acquire new parks. The voters said spend 
$100 million, build the branch libraries. The voters said do the 
Academy of Science. And I think the voters will say, when Prop A 
passes this time, do our Community College. Build one in 
Chinatown and build one in the Mission. And I think the previous 
bonded authorization offered for our school district, according to 
Arlene Ackerman, will result in building and renovating school 
district properties in the same way. All that contributes instantly to 
the income stream. 

It causes us not to be as pessimistic as may be the case for almost 
every other locale. Simultaneously, it means that we're going to 
have do a better job of controlling the nature of our expenditures. 
Yes, we can tighten up, as I am about to present to you how we do 
it. But once we agree upon that package, we've got to rigidly 



State of the City Address, 10.22.2001 
Page 19 



adhere to it. There cannot be any sacred cows coming in for a 
bump here and there. The bump is gone. There's no opportunity 
for bumping. 

If we manage this correctly, and if we participate, through Dianne 
Feinstein, Barbara Boxer and Nancy Pelosi, in the bailout packages 
that are being planned at the federal level, we may very well be in 
the position where, come next year's budget, we will have already 
begun to successfully deal with the issues surrounding the downturn 
in the economy. 

We're told that much of the economy will begin to show some 
movement in the First Quarter, and no later than the Second 
Quarter, 2002. I don't think we can wait for that. I think we have 
to be as cautious as we have previously been, and we have to be as 
focused on ensuring the safety in all three categories of our city. I 
think the report that I've given you affords us of that opportunity. 

I hope to join you, as you go about deliberating some of these 
things. I will join you on your own initiatives, to help. I am 
prepared to cooperate at every step with any good idea any of you 
may have. They may be better than some that I've offered. May 
even move faster than some that I've offered. 

But I will be prepared to be responsive, and as cooperative and as 
available as you would have me be. I thank you for permitting me 
to use your chambers for the purpose of delivering this State of the 
City. The sum total is: This city is safe. No reason for anybody to 
panic. The only thing contagious about what's going on now is 
panic. If we can avoid catching that disease, we can continue to be 
the lovely, wonderful, productive, enjoyable city that we all live in. 
Thank you very much. 



[End of speech] 



Mayor Gavin Nevvsom 

State of the City Address DOCUMENTS DLPT. 

October 21, 2004 

OCT 2 7 2005 

„, . „ ~ , , , SAN FRANCISCO 

I hank you all for being here today. PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Id like to start by acknowledging the members of the Board of Supervisors - 
thank you for your hard work and commitment to public service. 

And in particular, I'd like to acknowledge the President of the Board, Matt 
Gonzalez - thank you for your years of service. 

I'd also like to acknowledge City Attorney Dennis Herrera, Assessor Mabel 
Teng, newly-appointed Treasurer Jose Cisneros, District Attorney Kamala 
Harris, Public Defender Jeff Adachi, and Sheriff Mike Hennessey. 

I am proud that we're joined today by Congresswoman Roybull-Allard, 
Assemblyman Mark Leno, San Mateo County Supervisor Mike Nevin, 
former mayor, Willie Brown, as well as many other distinguished guests. 

I'm also proud to be joined today by the command staffs of our city's Fire 
and Police departments. In particular, I'd like to recognize Fire Chief Joanne 
Hayes-White and Police Chief Heather Fong - both pioneers and innovators 
in their fields. 

And of course, I'd like to thank Mission High School - the students, the 
faculty, Principal Kevin Truitt - as well as Superintendent of Schools, 
Arlene Ackerman and the School Board for having us here today. 



Not so many months ago, San Francisco gave me the great honor of serving 
this city as your 42nd Mayor. 

I found a San Francisco that was confident of its past but uncertain of its 
future... 

Confronted by the greatest economic downturn in recent memory and the 
largest budget gap in city history... 

Challenged to provide essential services in the face of staggering federal and 
state budget cuts... 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

Held captive by a growing gap between decision and execution, planning 
and reality... 

Other cities retreat in the face of such challenges. 

But I did not run for Mayor to lead a city in retreat. I believe this is a 
moment to advance. 

We are, after all, San Franciscans and there is no budget crisis that can cause 
us to surrender our core values. 

There is no economic downturn that can make us surrender in the fight for a 
safe, compassionate and livable city. 

I ran for Mayor to lead this city forward. And move forward we will. 

Together, we are advancing to a place where our community is healthier, 
safer and stronger. 

The state of our city is strong - and getting stronger 
each and every day. 

That's because we are doing what so many of us for so long have said was 
impossible. 

When some said homelessness was unsolvable... We started providing 
permanent supportive housing. 

When some said we could never be united... We passed a budget that 
navigated through the most severe financial crisis in our history. 

And when confronted by injustice, we had the courage to take a stand for 
equality and allow same sex couples the same rights and privileges all 
Americans are afforded. 

We are doing more with fewer resources. And here's why . . . 

Over the last 2 years, the state of California has cut $2.6 billion dollars from 
our cities and counties. 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 2 1 , 2004 

San Francisco, alone, has lost $70 million dollars in state funding to our 
city's General Fund and we will lose at least another $35 million dollars 
next year. 

Nationally, the problems are even more magnified. 

In the last 4 years, some 5 million Americans have lost their health 
insurance, now 45 million Americans have no health insurance at all. 

There has been a 56% increase in the cost of health care premiums. And 
Medicare costs are up a staggering 17.5% - the biggest increase in our 
history. 

Poverty is up not down - with 35.8 million Americans now living below the 
poverty line - and in just the last 4 years, 4.3 million more Americans have 
joined their ranks. These are families of 4 with total annual household 
income of $18,810. 

Nationally, unemployment is up - in the last 4 years, 1.6 million Americans 
have lost their jobs. 

500,000 kids lost their after-school programs, including 300,000 just last 
year alone. And another 100,000 kids are without childcare because of 
Federal cuts. 

In cities across America, homicide rates are up. Gang violence is up. At the 
same time, the Federal government has cut funding for 23,000 police 
officers. 

And recently, they allowed the Assault Weapons Ban to expire. Despite the 
heroic efforts of our Senator Dianne Feinstein, the same weapons of war that 
are being used in Iraq are now being made more readily available on our 
streets. 

Hope VI, the successful Federal program that turned around communities 
like North Beach Place and Bernal Dwellings, has had its funding cut by 
two-thirds. 

[I'd like to acknowledge Mayor Willie Brown, who is here today, for his 
success in securing almost $200 million dollars in Federal Hope VI funds 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

over the last 8 years - more than any other city in America. Thank you, 
Mayor Brown.] 

President Bush's 2005 budget, incidentally, will eliminate Hope VI entirely. 

And just this year, President Bush tried to block grant Section 8 Housing 
vouchers, which could have eliminated as many as a quarter of a million 
housing vouchers nationwide, and would have put at risk housing for some 
800 San Francisco families. 

Thanks to the leadership of Nancy Pelosi and our efforts at the US 
Conference of Mayors we were able to defeat this misguided initiative. 

We are living in a time of failed leadership at the state and federal levels. 
Cities like San Francisco have become America's first responders in almost 
every category, forced to create the solutions to the seemingly intractable 
problems facing America today. 

Confronted by this complete abdication of responsibility from the state and 
federal governments, we are a city that has remained true to our core values. 

Here in San Francisco, we've begun a revolution of solutions that challenges 
the status quo to innovate and reinvent... to rethink and reconnect our city 
with its people. 

We are fulfilling our obligation to educate, create jobs, build affordable 
housing, provide affordable health care and house the homeless. 

In the last decade alone, over 1,000 people lost their lives on our city's 
streets - they weren't murdered, they were homeless. 

Homelessness has replaced the Golden Gate Bridge and the Cable Car as 
one of the city's most defining symbols. It's the one thing that every San 
Franciscan can agree upon - homelessness is THE problem. 

Together, we have challenged the status quo and reconnected our most 
needy residents with vital services. 

When we could have just offered another shelter bed, we are increasingly 
offering a home - and supportive services - to the homeless. 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

Where others were defeated, we were determined. And now that 
determination is saving lives. 

Take Melvin Boyd, a Care Not Cash client. 

Until recently, Mr. Boyd was living in shelters and on our streets. He was 
unable to hold down a job. 

Just this May, Mr. Boyd was given a permanent home at the Graystone 
Hotel. Today, he has a steady job and recently moved out of the Graystone 
and into a subsidized apartment of his own. 

Mr. Boyd, we honor your struggles and salute your perseverance. And I 
thank you for being here today. 

The "Housing First" model, adopted under Care Not Cash, is a 
comprehensive approach that provides permanent supportive housing while 
addressing the underlying causes of homelessness. 

Since January, San Francisco has added 768 units of new supportive housing 
without spending one penny more of your tax dollars. 

We replaced the cash-based system of care with a service-enriched system, 
and by the end of the year, we will have over 940 new units of supportive 
housing. 

I'd like to thank Supervisor Dufty for his strong support of these efforts. 

Just last week, 300 city workers and volunteers took part in an historic effort 
called Project Homeless Connect. In one day, we connected 600 homeless 
San Franciscans with the services and referrals they need to get their lives 
back on track. 

I thank every one of those city workers and volunteers for standing up and 
being part of the solution. 

Today, I am proud to announce that this initiative will be made permanent. 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

Starting in November, Project Homeless Connect will bring hundreds of 
people out from behind their desks and onto the streets to conduct outreach 
at least one day each and every month. This, in addition to our ongoing daily 
outreach efforts. 

We've come so far - now is no time to retreat. 

We can end chronic homelessness if we have the courage and commitment 
to implement the 10-year plan developed under the leadership of Angela 
Alioto. 

I'd like to thank the members of the 10- Year Planning Council, including 
Supervisor Chris Daly for his support. 

The next step is passing Proposition A - the housing bond on this 
November's ballot. 

Prop. A will invest $90 million dollars in developing permanent supportive 
housing, making San Francisco a model for the country. By comparison, the 
Bush Administration's entire supportive housing budget is just $70 million 
dollars. 

Providing essential funding for supportive housing is only part of what 
Proposition A will do. 

It will invest $50 million dollars in the creation of new homeownership 
opportunities for low and moderate-income families. 

Prop. A will provide real home ownership opportunities for our middle 
class, rooting them in our city's future by making it possible for their 
children to own a home in this great city. 

We need more home ownership in the city and county of San Francisco. 

Prop. A will also invest $60 million dollars in the development of affordable 
rental housing for low-income families. 

We will leverage all these dollars with federal, state and civic contributions 
resulting in a total housing investment of close to $1 billion dollars. 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

I thank Supervisor Peskin and others at the Board for helping to craft this 
solution. 

As with housing and homelessness, we have a choice: stand behind the 
status quo or advance innovative and inventive solutions that reconnect the 
city with its people. 

Today, over 130,000 San Franciscans are without health insurance. 
Again we have a choice: retreat and accept the status quo or advance 
towards a healthier community by making universal health care a reality. 

We have chosen to move forward, connecting residents with the health care 
they need. This year, we've committed to providing health care for every 
eligible San Franciscan, not just ages 0-18, but ages 0-25. 

No other city, no other municipality, no other state in the entire country has 
done that. 

Healthy kids are essential to a healthy community but so too are healthy 
schools. 

Today, the City's direct investment in schools is the highest it has ever been. 

In future years, thanks to the leadership of Supervisor Tom Ammiano, 
Proposition H will set aside $60 million dollars annually for San Francisco 
schools to fund arts, music, physical education, early childhood education 
and other vital programs. 

But we did not wait for Prop H to kick in - because our kids cannot wait. 

The budget I signed in August, thanks to the efforts of Supervisors Sandoval 
and McGoldrick, immediately set aside $1 1 million dollars for city schools. 

I also followed through on my pledge to appoint a liaison to coordinate 
efforts between my office and the School District. 

As mayor, I recognize that I may not have direct responsibility or policy 
making for our schools, but together, we have an obligation to advance 
excellence for every San Franciscan. That's why improving our schools is 
among my highest priorities. 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

We have also made supporting Superintendent Ackerman's Dream Schools a 
top priority. 

These schools offer real hope for our city's youth in underperforming 
schools. 

And if there ever was a time to use the city's Rainy Day Fund, this was the 
year to do it. 

City schools received an additional $3.5 million dollars to create new safety 
initiatives, enhance athletic and arts programs even further, establish 
apprenticeships, and increase summer school funding. 

These funds will also be used to combat truancy, a serious problem plaguing 
our public schools and our community. 

Just a few days ago, we announced a new initiative to reduce truancy. And I 
thank Superintendent Ackerman for her hard work on that effort. 

Our commitment to San Francisco's youth does not end in the classroom. 

Today, San Francisco has 42 youth in the California Youth Authority. I 
believe the CYA is no place to send our children. 

We can do better. 

Today, I am announcing that we are convening a taskforce, led by Judge 
Katherine Feinstein and my office of Criminal Justice, in partnership with 
Public Defender Jeff Adachi, District Attorney Kamala Harris, Juvenile 
Probation and the Department of Children, Youth, and Their Families. 

This taskforce will develop a plan to ensure that none of San Francisco's 
children will be sent to the CYA. This plan will be in place by the end of my 
term. 

Today, without doubt our city's communities are healthier - and they are 
being made safer. 

Citywide, we are more ready than ever to respond to a catastrophe. 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

Whether manmade or mother nature, we remain steadfast in our resolve and 
readiness to keep San Francisco safe. 

With the help of Supervisor Ma, we have updated our Emergency 
Operations Plan for the first time in a decade, to reflect the new threats of 
the 21st Century. 

We have conducted joint training exercises with our Police, Fire, and Public 
Health departments. 

We've reached an unprecedented level of cooperation with our regional 
partners, conducting tabletop exercises and drills with other Bay Area first 
responders. 

And just this year we surpassed 1 1,000 city residents trained and ready to 
respond in the event of a disaster. 

Today, 1 am proud to announce San Francisco has been awarded a $700,000 
dollar Homeland Security grant that will make it possible to significantly 
expand our Neighborhood Emergency Response program. 

While planning for the unknown is essential, it has not prevented us from 
focusing on the day-to-day reality on San Francisco's streets. 

It's been a difficult 9 and a half months since I took office. 

While violent crime has dropped 5% overall... 

Homicide rates have soared. And Gang violence has escalated. 

And we suffered the brutal slaying of one of the city's finest - police officer. 
Isaac Espinoza, the first officer to be shot and killed in the line of duty in a 
decade. 

Today, I express our city's gratitude to Officer Espinoza for his service and 
our sorrow to his family. This city will never forget your sacrifice. 

The problems are real. 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

But we cannot turn a blind eye or shrug our shoulders hoping they go away. 

No. We are doing just the opposite. 

I asked for more beat officers - and we got them. Today there are 44 
additional officers walking a neighborhood beat, including 16 officers 
patrolling public housing. And we have plans to hire an additional 150 new 
officers over the next 18 months. 

We are using new technologies like crime mapping that provide real time 
data to police officers, helping to identify hotspots and better allocate 
resources. 

And today I am announcing we will be bringing the CompStat model of 
policing to our Police Department within the next 6 months. 

But we cannot stop there. 

What value is increased public safety and prosperity if not every San 
Franciscan feels more secure or is better off than they were yesterday? 

In truth, while we are one city united in name, we remain separate 
communities. 

In our city's southeast, there's a San Francisco that is a community apart. 
Separated by geography, violence, and decades of neglect. 

Despite over 40 years of promises, programs, speeches, high rhetoric, and 
good intentions, economic and social conditions in the southeast are getting 
worse not better. 

It's there, in the Bay view, Hunters Point, Visitacion Valley and Potrero Hill 
that our problems are magnified. 

For too long we have calmly accepted newspaper reports of young men 
being gunned down in their youth. 

14 year-olds killing 15 year-olds. A 25 year-old man, suspected of killing a 
6 week-old baby. 



10 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
Slate of the City Address 
October 2 1 , 2004 

We glorify killing on television and in the movies. And we call it 
entertainment. 

At the same time, we make it easy for men and women of all shades of 
sanity to acquire whatever weapons they desire. 

We can crack down on crime - and we have. But punishment is not 
prevention - nor an armed camp a place of peace. 

We can spend money on the problems - and we have. But the answer is one 
we've always known, though sometimes have forgotten - money by itself is 
no answer. 

Programs which are misguided accomplish nothing. 

Program passing, after all, is not problem solving. 

In fact, laws and government programs are only part of the answer. 

The solution lies in reconnecting the communities of the southeast with City 
Hall and the rest of San Francisco. 

It's time for an order of magnitude change. 

It is our task to connect hope with opportunity, to replace despair with jobs, 
and connect potential with solutions. 

Just yesterday, I announced the Communities of Opportunity Initiative, an 
unprecedented effort that responds to the needs of our most neglected and 
disadvantaged neighborhoods. 

This initiative will focus on reforming the way we deliver services, building 
better housing, and job creation. 

As part of that initiative, I am today announcing the creation of a local Hope 
VI program that will replace failed public housing developments with 
vibrant communities. 

These communities will blend new housing, mixed income and commercial 
development. 



ll 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

No longer will our public housing be isolated from the rest of the city. 

And while we will work to provide people with decent homes, we know that 
everyone also needs good jobs and the financial tools to get out of poverty. 

That's why we created a local Earned Income Tax Credit, the Working 
Families Credit that will put money directly into the hands of the working 
poor. 

The Federal Earned Income Tax Credit is one of the most successful anti- 
poverty programs in our country's history, just after social security. 

We hope to provide up to $6 million dollars to San Francisco's working 
families, allowing them to keep more of what they earn. 

The city has already committed $3 million dollars over the next 
2 years for the Working Families Credit. 

Today, I challenge San Francisco's corporate and philanthropic communities 
to match that contribution. 

In addition, we must also improve the way our government connects with its 
people by reforming our relationship with community based organizations. 

There is not a problem or a program which hundreds of service providers 
and bureaucrats are not earnestly at work. But does that represent in each 
case a solution to our problems? 

Manifestly, it does not. 

The truth is while many service providers do great work, many others are 
not accountable for outcomes and results. 

Over the next year we will double the number of performance audits of city 
contracts and finally bring more accountability to the way services are 
delivered. 

In every neighborhood and every community in our city, we are advancing 
our core values - improving our quality of life by helping others. 



12 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

In June, my office of Community Development launched Project Connect. 

Its mission: to ask the people of San Francisco how we as a city can do 
better. We asked what works, what doesn't work, what should be discarded 
and what should be fixed. 

Some 867 volunteers and city workers, including Supervisor Sophie 
Maxwell, knocked on 10,333 doors in some of the most underserved 
communities in our city including Visitacion Valley, Bayview Hunters 
Point, the Western Addition, the Tenderloin, the Mission, Chinatown and 
Potrero Hill. 

Just yesterday we announced the results of Project Connect. And I'm sure 
the findings will come as no surprise: 

While people have new job skills - they lack the jobs to go with them. 

People want and need housing that's safe, clean and affordable. 

They need safer streets. 

And they want the opportunity to build businesses and grow their own 
community's economy. 

Today, I stand before you to say, we heard you. And we are responding. 

Today, I am announcing that Project Connect will become San Francisco 
Connect, connecting San Franciscans to business, arts, education, parks, 
housing, health care, job training and job placement, and the entire array of 
services that we provide. 

This unprecedented initiative, which we are making permanent, will not only 
connect San Franciscans with services, it will connect San Franciscans with 
one another. It is an opportunity for our residents to give back to the city 
which has given so much to all of us. 

Today, I call upon every resident to become part of San Francisco Connect. 
To volunteer your time and join this effort in changing the way we live and 
the way we view one another. 



13 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

As we connect our most vulnerable residents with the services they need, we 
are also working to improve the quality of life for every San Franciscan by 
cleaning our streets, planting new trees, and creating even more open space. 

I am proud to report that while we are the most densely populated American 
city, we achieved a 63% recycling rate; compare that with New York, the 
second most densely populated American city, which recycles at just 20%. 

We are softening the edges of our urban landscape to make our streets more 
friendly and more welcoming. 

We are greening the median strips along Van Ness Avenue and Sloat 
Boulevard - a project championed by Supervisor Sean Elsbernd. And in the 
coming year, we will do the same for Lombard Street, Geary Boulevard and 
Junipero Serra Boulevard. 

We are committed to leaving our environment healthier and stronger than we 
found it. 

As evidenced in our ongoing efforts to increase solar power, adopt green 
building technologies, to improve air quality, to reduce harmful toxics, and 
implement a comprehensive urban forestry plan. 

We are also the only city in the country that has adopted a precautionary 
principle. It is better to be safe than sorry. 

When it comes to the environment, we are leading this country by example. 
That's why the United Nations picked San Francisco to host World 
Environment Day in June 2005. 

Mayors from all around the world and UN Secretary Kofi Annan are coming 
to this city to learn from us and to share best practices. 

Our commitment to the environment and a higher quality of life is 
complemented by our long-term strategy to grow the economy and create the 
jobs of the future. 

Many of these jobs are in conservation and clean energy. And San Francisco 
is committed to leading the way in these new industries. 



14 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 2 1 , 2004 

We are also making headway in bridging the Digital Divide. 

Recently, we made free wireless internet available in 
Union Square. 

Today, I'm announcing that we will bring WiFi to our Civic Center, to 
Portsmouth Square and to Ferry Plaza. 

And we will not stop until every San Franciscan has access to free wireless 
internet service. 

We are also developing plans to bring wireless technologies and free 
computers to our affordable housing developments and community centers 
throughout San Francisco. 

These technologies will connect our residents to the skills and the jobs of 
this new economy. No San Franciscan should be without a computer and a 
broadband connection. 

I believe that we cannot be for jobs, if we are against business. The private 
sector is the engine of our economic growth and the fuel for a better 
tomorrow. 

Indeed, without the growth of the private sector, none of the goals we have 
outlined for the next 3 years can be achieved. 

That's why in the last 100 days, we have met with over 100 CEOs of the 
biggest and fastest growing companies in San Francisco, to hear from them 
about what is working and what is not. 

In the coming months, our Office of Economic and Workforce Development 
will unveil a series of initiatives based on these meetings, to bring together 
the public and private sectors in new and innovative ways. 

I am committed to making San Francisco a more business friendly city. 

One of the great opportunities for San Francisco in our economic future is in 
life sciences, nano-tech and bio-tech industries. 



15 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

San Francisco is the birthplace of over 70 bio-tech companies yet none of 
these companies are currently located in the city. These companies are 
supporting 85,000 jobs in the Bay Area but only 30 here at home. 

Recognizing the problem and resolving it are altogether different. 

That's why I was proud to work with the Board of Supervisors, particularly 
Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier, to sign into law a bio-tech tax credit, to 
encourage these companies to return to their birthplace. 

And to make sure every resident benefits from these new economic 
opportunities, we are working with City College to create bio-tech job 
training programs. 

It is also time to revitalize and clean up our neighborhoods. 

We will begin by turning the mid-market area into a world-class arts and 
culture district. 

Today, I am announcing the long-overdue renovation of UN and Halidie 
Plazas, which will be complete by May of next year. 

We will create Community Benefits Districts in Noe Valley, the Tenderloin, 
Polk, Fillmore, Third Streets, as well as San Bruno, Ocean and Leland 
Avenues. 

Committing merchants and property owners to invest in their areas by 
planting trees and flowers, placing benches, cleaning sidewalks, graffiti 
removal, and so much more. 

And most notably, we expect to break ground on the Hunters Point Shipyard 
by spring of next year. 

After 30 years of promises, we are finally taking action. 

When completed this project will provide 1,600 housing units, 1/3 of which 
will be affordable, and 34 acres of open space, parks, community facilities, 
job training as well as jobs. 

This is the moment the southeast has been waiting for since 1974. 



16 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

By every measure, we are making progress in San Francisco: 

Unemployment is down. Hotel occupancy is up. 

Everything that should be up - is up. and everything that should be down - 
is down. 

Including cruise ship activity, up 43% over last year. 

Retail and residential construction is on the rise. 

Travel to the city is up. 

Airlines, including United, Air New Zealand and Icelandair are expanding 
service to San Francisco. 

And Virgin Airlines is making SFO their home. 

And business investment is up. Since January, over a dozen businesses have 
made San Francisco their home, including. Gymboree; Cathay Pacific; 
H&M; the Body Shop; Primitive Logic; and Design Within Reach. 

While we are moving in the right direction, challenges remain. 

When I took office we faced an unprecedented budget deficit. 

It challenged us to ask ourselves: Do we care more about clean parks and 
safe streets than we do about health care and after school programs? 

Or do we care more about housing the homeless than we do about providing 

a 

first-rate education for our kids? 

Our answer was clear: Unlike the state and federal governments, we will not 
pass our problems on to others. 

We will not borrow from tomorrow to pay for today. 

We will not sacrifice this generation for the next. 



17 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

We have made tough choices. 

In the last 8 months we have eliminated 955 city positions. 

We have consolidated 5 departments and streamlined redundant services. 

We have achieved an historic agreement with city workers, securing $138 
million dollars in savings. 

I'd like to thank the city's workers and labor leaders. 

But if we are to continue to advance as a city and as a community, we must 
come together this November to pass Propositions J and K. 

This is not an easy choice. Taxes never are. But neither are budget cuts. 

The plain truth is: without passage of these measures, we will have to cut 
$97 million dollars from our budget over the next 18 months. 

Make no mistake, this would have a devastating impact on our city - and the 
services we provide and the people we serve. 

Passage of Props J and K will allow us to continue rethinking the scope and 
purpose of City Hall. And will allow us to continue connecting the city with 
its people. 

As we continue to work through this unprecedented budget deficit, we must 
take every precaution, as well, against future downturns. 

That's why I am proposing a Charter Amendment to require a ten-year 
capital plan, a two-year budget cycle and stronger fiscal safeguards. 

We can and we must do a better job planning for today and tomorrow. 

I pledge to you that if you do your part - City Hall will do its part as well. 

On April 14, this year, my administration launched San Francisco Stat, a 
powerful performance management program that will improve services and 
make government work better. 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

Rather than responding to an audit every few years, department heads now 
report monthly, with REAL data about budgets, overtime, absenteeism, 
contracts, and customer service. 

How many potholes has DPW filled this month, and how does that compare 
to last month? 

How many false alarms did the Fire Department respond to, and how can we 
reduce them? 

How many homeless San Franciscans have gotten into housing? 

We're asking the tough questions and departments are responding with real 
answers - supported by real data. 

But we're not stopping there. 

It's time to make city government more accessible and more accountable. 

In 18 months, we will have in place a single telephone number for accessing 
all City services. 

Right now there are hundreds of phone numbers for accessing City 
government. It's no wonder that over 50% of all the calls going to 9-1-1 are 
for non-emergencies. 

But at least somebody answers the phone. 

We're going to replace those numbers with ONE: 3-1-1. 

If you need graffiti removed from your property, to report a stolen wallet, to 
get a Muni schedule, to find out where to get a flu shot or a marriage license, 
you will be able to dial one simple phone number. 

You'll get a human being on the phone 24-hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 
days a year. No longer will you get a busy signal, or a voicemail or a phone 
tree. 



1Q 



Mayor Gavin Newsom 
State of the City Address 
October 21, 2004 

Everywhere you look in San Francisco, there are signs of renewed optimism, 
prosperity and hope... 

You can see it in the new Third Street Light Rail that will begin running 
next year. 

Along the new Octavia Boulevard, which is a model for what streetscapes, 
transit-oriented development and community-based planning is all about. 

In the new housing opportunities at Mission Bay and Treasure Island. 

At the Transbay Terminal, which is an historic partnership with state and 
federal agencies to provide high speed rail and a hub for Bay Area transit. 

You can see it in the myriad of new cultural opportunities that will soon be 
available to every San Franciscan, like the new De Young Museum, African 
Diaspora Museum, Jewish Museum, Mexican Museum and the new 
Academy of Sciences. 

Today, I stand before you as someone who has never been more proud to be 
a San Franciscan. 

In the face of great challenges, we have remained true to our values. 

We have begun a revolution of solutions. 

And though, as Thomas Jefferson wrote, "the generation that commences a 
revolution rarely completes it," I am not discouraged. 

Because we are a city that dares to ask "What if. . ." 

What if we offer permanent supportive housing to the homeless? 

What if we clean up the playgrounds and streets across this city? 

What if we make it possible for average San Franciscans to own their own 
home? 

What if we make universal health care a reality? 



20 



Mayor Gavin Nevvsom 
State of the City Address 
October 2 1 , 2004 

What if we offered job training tied to actual jobs? 

What if we replaced substandard housing developments with safe and 
healthy communities? 

What if we made every San Francisco neighborhood safer, healthier and 
stronger. . . 

What if we try what's never been tried before? 

Over the next three years, that's exactly what this city is going to do. 

I am confident that we will continue to move forward, continue to find 
solutions that bring San Franciscans together... 

Solutions that advance our goal of building one city, one community, 
comprised of diverse people, living and advancing across every conceivable 
difference... 

But connected always by hope and the conviction that together we can make 
a better tomorrow. 

Thank you. 

### 



21 



Mayor Gavin Newsom documents dept. 

State of the City nov 2 o 2006 

October 26, 2006 SAN francisco 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Tackling the Unfinished Business of San Francisco 

Thank you all very much for being here today. 

I'd like to start by acknowledging the members of the 

San Francisco Board of Supervisors 

President of the Board, Aaron Peskin 

Supervisor Tom Ammiano 

Supervisor Chris Daly 

Supervisor Bevan Dufty 

Supervisor Sean Elsbernd 

Supervisor Sophie Maxwell 

Supervisor Jake McGoldrick 

Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi 

And Supervisor Gerardo Sandoval. 

Thank you all for your unwavering commitment to 
the people of San Francisco and for your work to 
make our City a better place. 

I'd like to acknowledge 
Assemblyman Mark Leno. . . 
Our District Attorney, Kamala Harris. 
Our Sheriff, Mike Hennesey. 



Our Treasurer, Jose Cisneros. 
Our Assessor, Phil Ting. 
Our Public Defender, Jeff Adachi. 
Our City Controller, Ed Harrington. 
Our City Administrator, Ed Lee. 

And of course - it is my honor to recognize former 
Mayor Willie Brown. 

And thank you to Burton High School - and Principal 
Eric Marshall - for hosting us. 

And the members of the Junior and Senior Class... 

I'd also like to take a moment to acknowledge a very 
special guest - the Democratic nominee for Mayor of 
Washington DC - in other words the Mayor-Elect of 
Washington DC - Adrian Fenty. 

I am proud as well to be joined today by the 
command staffs of our Fire and Police Departments. 

In particular, I'd like to recognize Fire Chief Joanne 
Hayes- White and Police Chief Heather Fong - both 
of whom have taken bold steps to ensure that our 
streets are safer and our neighborhoods are stronger. 



When I took office nearly three years ago, San 
Francisco was facing daunting economic challenges. 

The dot.com bust - and the shock of 9-1 1 hit our 
local economy hard. 

We were facing historic budget deficits - 
unemployment and office vacancies 
were near all time highs - 
and expectations 
were at an all time low. 

As I look back now - I'm proud of how San 
Franciscans came together to overcome these 
challenges. 

In just a few years we've gone from historic budget 
deficits to the highest city budget reserve in history. 

In the last 3 years, unemployment is down a 
remarkable 26 percent - and over 6,300 new jobs 
have been created in the last year alone. 

Some 57 companies have located or relocated back to 
San Francisco during this period - 17 in the last 9 
months ... 

And visitors are returning to our city 



in remarkable numbers. . . 

The Convention and Visitors Bureau, 

for example, enjoyed a record-breaking year 

in 2005, booking 925 convention groups - 

representing more than 2.2 million hotel room-nights 

over the next 16 years. . . 

And 2006 looks to be on pace to exceed 2005. 

We've raised our bond rating. . . cut millions of 
dollars of waste from the city budget... began long 
overdue civil service reform... improved our use of 
technology and focused on serving more people more 
efficiently... 

And we've put the city budget back on sound 
economic footing. At the same time - taking giant 
steps to make sure that our region's economy remains 
strong. 

We came together with leaders like Supervisor 
Alioto-Pier, to bring the headquarters of the 
California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to the 
City. 

And already, the $3 billion dollar stem cell institute is 
proving a catalyst for biotech and life sciences. 



Indeed, just this month FibroGen, with over 200 
employees, announced its plan to move to Mission 
Bay. 

Three years ago - biotech and life sciences in 
Mission Bay were just a dream. Today they are a 
reality with an exciting future for all of us. 

In a city known for its divisive political climate - we 
were united in the face of these challenges - and our 
accomplishments are justly shared by all of us here 
today. 

In the face of those great economic challenges- we 
were still able to look forward and address many of 
the long-term issues that confront all of us in our city, 
our state and our nation. 

As Washington failed - and Sacramento ducked - 
we honored our responsibility to insure that the basic 
human right of health care is enjoyed by all San 
Franciscans. 

In the next year, we will begin implementing this 
historic Health Access Plan - ensuring that all 82,000 
San Franciscans currently without health insurance 
are guaranteed comprehensive high-quality health 
care. 



I want to thank to the leadership of Supervisor 
Tom Ammiano - and every single one of you 
who were instrumental in creating 
this unique and innovative plan. 

As a City, we took on health care - one of the 
greatest challenges facing our country today - and 
found an innovative solution... 

Now at this moment, as we enjoy stronger 
revenue, continuing job growth and greater 
opportunity - it is time that we take - head on - 
the unfinished business of our City. 

It is certainly true that San Francisco is nationally and 
internationally recognized as a City of innovation, 
entrepreneurialship and discovery... 

But San Francisco is still a small and precious place. 

Still just 47 and a half square miles and 740,000 
souls. 

And in this fragile place - our challenge is to 
preserve the qualities that make this the finest city in 
the world. 



The irony is - that while it has become easier to find 
a job, it's become harder to find a seat on the bus. 

Our budget reserves may be filling up - but so are 
our streets, our sidewalks and parks. 

San Franciscans have more money in their pockets. 
But the cost of basic goods and services is going up, 
and the economic challenges facing working families, 
particularly families with school age children, have 
never been greater. 

The question before us today - then - is how do 
we as a City - answer these challenges... 

How do we keep our economy strong - without 
making our quality of life worse? 

How do we continue to offer the kind of 
compassionate government we so desperately need - 
without making this city more expensive for middle 
class and working families? 

How do we make room for the new housing our 
residents so desperately need - without displacing 
our fellow San Franciscans by pricing them out and 
gentrifying our neighborhoods? 



How do we dare to dream big - while not forgetting 
to fill the potholes, clean our streets and parks and 
address the small problems of urban life that make 
such a big difference in our quality of life? 

These are the challenges facing San Francisco. And 
to many of us here today - they sound very familiar. 

Just a few short years ago - in the midst of the dot- 
com boom - our city was divided over just these 
questions. 

Long debated and long discussed, these vexing issues 
have - in truth - simply have been long deferred. 

In the months and years ahead - we have an 
opportunity to address these challenges... to answer 
how we can be a model for the world - and still be a 
place of sustainability, affordability and quality of 
life for all San Franciscans. 

Thanks to our strong economy - we now have the 
funds to address these persistent problems. Now it is 
up to us to muster the will as a city to see the job 
through. 



Some of these issues may seem small. But truly, they 
make the difference between whether people want to 
commit to staying here for the long term or not. 

Certainly - filling potholes doesn't make headlines... 

But it does make a difference. 

So - as we talk about improving our quality of life - 
let's start right there - with those terrible marks of 
urban decay - those potholes. 

It doesn't matter how you got here today - by bus, by 
bike or car - you probably hit one, or many. 

I believe we can fulfill our promise as a city - and fill 
those potholes. 

But to do that, we have to stop deferring. . . and 
deferring. . . and deferring - the simple maintenance 
of our basic infrastructure. 

San Francisco has 12,458 blocks of pavement - 60 
percent of which are in serious need of repair. 

Some streets need total repaving - others just need 
that pothole filled to make them safe. 



That's why - thanks in large part to the vision and 
support of Supervisor Sean Elsbernd, we are 
investing $30 million dollars this year to fill those 
potholes, repave those streets and finally - finally 
begin to address the over $380 million dollars needed 
to bring our streets into repair. 

At the same time - we are taking a much-needed step 
to resolve one of the biggest reasons our streets are in 
such bad shape. 

And that's the damage done by projects to repair and 
upgrade sewers, power, cable and other vital 
infrastructure that tear up our streets - and too often 
leave them in worse condition than they were to 
begin with. 

To ensure that these projects no longer compromise 

our street quality - today 

I am proposing new Restoration Guidelines requiring 

that the agencies responsible for tearing up our streets 

- be it a utility or cable company - or even our own 

sister agency, the Public Utilities Commission - 

return the pavement 

to as-good or better condition 

than when the work began. 



10 



The Department of Public Works will inspect the 
repaying to ensure that our streets are repaired to an 
acceptable level. 

Not just patchwork. 

But we're not just focusing on our streets. After all 
San Francisco should be a pedestrian oasis. 

Walking is one of the best ways to experience our 
neighborhoods and enjoy our breathtaking views. 

But our sidewalks - like our streets - suffer from the 
very same neglect . 

With 5,298 blocks of sidewalk - the reality is, City 
Hall is only legally responsible for the maintenance 
of just 106 blocks. 

Let me repeat that... 5,298 blocks of sidewalk. And 
the City is only responsible legally 
for 106 blocks. 

The remaining sidewalks are the responsibility 
of property owners. 

This year alone, the City is investing 
some three-quarters of a million dollars 



ii 



to fix our sidewalks. 

At the same time, I recognize that upkeep can often 
be too expensive for the average property owner to 
afford. 

That's why, today, I am proud to announce a plan to 
help property owners repair and maintain their 
sidewalks. 

DPW will go out and inspect them - and notify 
property owners of deficiencies. 

Property owners will then have the option to self 
correct the problems, or have a DPW sponsored 
contractor perform the necessary work. 

Property owners - conveniently - will either be 
assessed directly or through their property tax bill. 

We won't see a difference overnight - but we will 
make a difference in the years to come - on both our 
streets and our sidewalks. 

Filling the potholes and repairing our streets and 
sidewalks - will make day to day life a little bit 
better. 



12 



But as you know, if we want to have any hope of 
making San Francisco a more enjoyable and easier 
place to live... 

We simply must make it possible for more people to 
get back and forth to work - and school - without 
having to get into their cars and fight for a parking 
space. 

The best way to do that - is to make our public 
transportation system faster and more reliable. 

MUNI, alone, carries almost 700,000 passengers 
every day -roughly equivalent to the entire 
population of the City - making it one of the most 
heavily used transit systems in America. 

But the truth is, the current network was designed in 
the late 70s, and San Francisco today is a very 
different place. 

We need to develop a transit system that works not 
only for today but also for tomorrow. 

Certainly, in the past several years MUNI has made 
great strides. But fare hikes and budget cuts have 
taken their toll on riders and the system. 



13 



And as any San Franciscan who has been late to work 
because the bus just didn't come - or when it did it 
was too full to board, can tell you - we haven't done 
enough to improve MUNI in a way that riders can see 
and feel. 

Make no mistake - we are not going to sit back and 
wait for MUNI to derail. 

As mayor, I recognize that while I don't have direct 
responsibility or policy authority over day to day 
decisions at the Metropolitan Transportation 
Authority - Proposition E wisely divests politics 
from this discussion. . . 

... I do bear a direct obligation and responsibility to 
make our transit first policy a reality for all San 
Franciscans. 

Frankly - 1 don't think it's too much to ask for the 
buses to run on time. 

Under Director Nat Ford, we are taking concrete 
steps to better MUNI's reliability and on-time 
performance. 

For the first time in 25 years - a quarter of a century 
- we are conducting a system wide analysis of routes 



14 



and ridership, with a goal to fundamentally overhaul 
service. 

This Transit Effectiveness Project - or TEP - is a 
visionary effort to fundamentally reform and improve 
MUNI. 

It is an 18-month study and analysis of almost 80 
lines, 5,000 bus and train stops and travel patterns. 

Fundamentally it seeks to reshape the system to meet 
the needs of today's new realities - and anticipate 
tomorrow's challenges. 

The TEP defines a new vision for transportation in 
the City. 

This study will recommend adjustments to service 
based on geography, trip purpose, population, and 
utilization during different times of the day. 

It will analyze best practices of peer systems 
throughout the US and abroad. 

It will focus on load factors, stop spacing, line 
spacing and headways - technical - but critical 
factors in making the system run on-time. 



15 



It will determine appropriate vehicle types and 
passenger facility needs. 

And most importantly, it will focus on new avenues 
for increasing revenue - beyond fare increases - and 
recommend areas to reduce costs. 

No idea is too big or too small to be considered - but 
the end result will be simple: 

MUNI will get you where you're going faster. 

By this time next year - when the plan is complete - 
we will have a blueprint for reform. 

But we're not going to wait until then to implement 
the small things that will make a big difference in our 
everyday commute. 

We are going to be smarter about how we use 
existing resources - because I believe that we can 
raise MUNI to a higher level of performance. 

That's why today, I am announcing a new pilot 
program that will demonstrate what we can - and 
should expect - from MUNI on one of our most 
heavily used bus lines - the 1 California. 



We are going to put more line managers on the street, 
- to help manage the flow of bus traffic. 

And beginning next week, we're going to add 
parking control officers at problem intersections at 
peak hours - to ensure that gridlock does not keep 
you from getting to work on time. 

We're going to work to change state law to 
strengthen enforcement of double parking laws in bus 
lanes. 

We're going to work with MUNI to explore changes 
like expanded hours for express service, larger 
vehicles on express routes and backdoor boarding. 

This pilot will show what's possible when we focus 
our energy and attention on getting results. 

If it proves effective - and efficient - we will expand 
it to other key lines. 

In the meantime, we are working to speed up other 
high-use routes by implementing Bus Rapid Transit 
on Van Ness Avenue and Geary Boulevard. 

The BRT - as it's called - creates dedicated lanes for 
public transit, allows passengers to embark and 



17 



disembark more efficiently and takes advantage of 
SFGo - our state-of-the-art integrated traffic 
management system - that gives buses priority in real 
time. 

Make no mistake - we will work closely with 
Merchants to address their concerns before 
implementing this program. 

We are also going to make it easier to purchase a Fast 
Pass. 

Right now, many people have to stand in line to buy 
a Fast Pass and, as hard as it is to believe, sometimes 
they run out. 

That's going to stop. 

I have directed the MTA to explore the feasibility of 
placing Fast Pass distribution machines at Metro 
stations and MUNI kiosks throughout the city - so 
that riders don't need to go out of their way to 
purchase a Fast Pass. 

We are also going to make pre-paid parking meter 
cards available online next year. 



So if you find yourself needing to drive - parking at a 
meter will no longer require a roll of quarters. 

I have also directed the MTA to make installation of 
NextBus technology and new bus shelters a priority. 
We have been talking about this technology and these 
new shelters for too long. 

The time to act is now. . . so that when you're waiting 
for the bus or streetcar you will know exactly when 
the next one is coming. . . 

NextBus technology also lets you check on your bus 
from your home computer and your mobile phone, 
taking one of the biggest stresses out of commuting - 
not knowing when that next bus is going to arrive. 

In collaboration with the Chair of the Transportation 

Authority, Supervisor McGoldrick, and other key 

transportation leaders, 

I know we can get this done 

and fulfill these long-overdue promises. 

In this day and age - more and more people are using 
their bikes to get to and from work. 



19 



It is an increasingly important way to confront the 
challenges of traffic congestion, traffic pollution, and 
health problems caused by a lack of physical activity. 

We need to make biking safer and easier. 

While San Francisco is already considered one of the 
best big cities in the country for bicycle commuting - 
we can do more. 

So there is no misunderstanding - let me make this 
clear - the lawsuit holding up our bike plan will not 
stop us. 

Whatever the judge's decision - we will continue our 
long term planning to create a citywide bicycle 
network, uniting the current patchwork of bike lanes 
into a unified, comprehensive system. 

It is also time to take steps to reach our goal of 
making 10% of all commute trips in the City bicycle 
trips within the next 3 and a half years. 

While making MUNI faster and bike riding safer - 
we aim to get people out of their cars and get them 
healthier - so we must commit to reducing emissions 
from our public transportation fleet. 



20 



With new hybrid busses coming on line, we can now 
say by this time next year, we will have the greenest 
public transportation fleet in the nation. 

I think we can all agree that the more people who get 
out of their cars and use alternative transit - the better 
this city is going to be for everyone. 

Another way of doing this is to have safe, reliable 
and affordable taxi service. 

Recent legislation passed by the Board 
makes San Francisco 
one of the most expensive cities 
in the country to take a taxi. 

The reality is, when people know they can get a taxi 
in a pinch - it keeps them from using their car for 
short trips. 

But if taking a taxi is going to cost you more - 
something that I continue to believe was a mistake - 
then at least we should make it easier for people to 
find one. 

Customer service in the taxi industry is simply 
behind the times. 



21 



We are one of the most technologically-advanced 
cities in the world, yet taxis are still being dispatched 
by radio. 

We are a transit first city, but not when getting a taxi 
means being placed on hold for ten minutes before 
even talking to a dispatcher. 

For the taxi industry to survive - and for San 
Franciscans to get the best service possible - we must 
move this industry - into this century. 

I challenge the Taxi Commission and its industry 
partners to create a centralized dispatch system 
available online and by phone. 

This idea was first proposed by our new Executive 
Director of the Taxi Commission in 1999 and 7 years 
later we are still debating it. . . It's time has come. 

Another idea whose time has come - is a substantial 
expansion of taxi stands. 

Anyone that's been to the Caltrain station at Fourth 
and Townsend, knows the importance of taxi stands. 

So I am directing the Taxi Commission and the 
MTA, in coordination with, AC Transit, BART and 



22 



our other transit partners to install taxi stands at every 
major transit hub in the city - not just downtown. 

Recognizing that there are peak hours of need in our 
neighborhoods - we will also create a comprehensive 
system of taxi stands throughout our neighborhoods. 

What's more, I am asking the Taxi Commission to 
require that a Taxi Rider's Bill of Rights be posted in 
every cab, with complaints and compliments directed 
to our new 3 1 1 call center. 

. . . More on that later. . . 

Now - I recognize that as Mayor I cannot simply 
wave my hand and make it so. . . but today I sent a 
letter to the Taxi Commission asking that they 
require all new taxis to accept credit cards - and be 
GPS enabled. 

Why GPS? Well... 

GPS, is the first step we must take in order 
to make a centralized dispatch system a reality. 

I have also directed the Taxi Commission to continue 
the transition of our entire taxi fleet to hybrid, 
alternative-fuel and other green vehicles, so that by 



23 



2011 - in just four years - every cab in San Francisco 
will be clean. 

Incidentally, we have the second highest number of 
alternative fuel cabs in the nation - but we can do 
better. 

As we clean and green our taxi fleet we must also 
make an investment in a cleaner and greener San 
Francisco. 

That's why we are expanding our Livable City 
Initiative to green our streets and help define the 
unique characteristics of each of our neighborhoods. 

We have secured $8 million dollars in federal and 
local funds to begin major streetscape improvements, 
everything from planting trees and improving median 
strips to repairing sidewalks and replacing street 
lamps. 

We are completing 

San Bruno Avenue and Lombard Street... Beginning 

work on 

Van Ness Avenue and Polk Street. . . 

And Balboa and Ocean Avenue are now in the 
planning stages. 



24 



Our goal is to not only soften the edges of our urban 
landscape but to restore a sense of pride and place by 
revamping at least one major street or corridor in 
every Supervisorial district. 

Let me thank Supervisor Dufty, and others, who have 
long championed this initiative. 

In addition to these streetscape improvements - we 
are making progress on our pledge to plant 25,000 
new street trees by 20 1 1 . 

As we did last year - in the next 12 months, we will 
plant another 5,000 trees on our streets, our open 
spaces - and in our neighborhood parks. 

And speaking of neighborhood parks - I don't think 
it's too much to ask that they be kept clean and safe. 

I also don't think it's too much to ask that residents 
be able to use their fields and gyms easily - without 
the cumbersome reservation policy that now exists. 

By early next year, all Rec and Park users will be 
able to reserve play fields, gymnasiums and register 
for classes - online. 



25 



And for those without a computer or internet access, 
we will expand the number of sites across the City 
where you can make a reservation in person - cutting 
down on wait time and making it more convenient for 
all of us. 

Supervisor Ma - who has long fought to make these 
changes a reality, will no doubt welcome these 
reforms - as 

I imagine, every baseball, softball, football and 
soccer league in the City. 

While all San Franciscans should be able to enjoy a 
clean and safe park near their home. 

All residents should also be able to walk in 
neighborhoods that are clean and safe 
on streets - 
free of litter and garbage. 

That's why this month, we launched the Clean 
Corridors program that focuses on our main 
commercial districts. 

Over the next 9 months, DPW crews will be out in 
force on 100 blocks across the City. 



26 



You will see City workers on Third Street this 
week... and on Mission Street and Grant Avenue 
next month... removing graffiti, picking up trash and 
bringing these 100 key corridors to a higher standard 
of care and cleanliness. 

This initiative, if it proves successful - and I believe 
it will - will be substantially expanded in the coming 
year. 

Another successful tool to improve our neighborhood 
commercial corridors, is the creation of more 
Community Benefit Districts. 

Thanks in large part to Supervisor Aaron Peskin, 
neighborhood groups and merchant associations now 
have the ability to come together - to form these 
CBDs - to expand daily street cleaning, to plant new 
trees, to sponsor neighborhood festivals, to provide 
new signage and banners and other improvements. 

When I took office - we had only one CBD in Union 
Square. 

Last year, I pledged to create 6 more - and we're 
well on our way to making this a reality. 



27 



The Fillmore and Central Market Districts were both 
recently approved and just yesterday, I signed 
enabling legislation forming the new Fisherman's 
Wharf CBD. 

We need to encourage every other neighborhood and 
every other business district in our City to do the 
same. 

That's why in next year's budget, I will include 
matching grant funding for merchants, residents and 
property owners interested in forming these districts. 

I will also add additional matching capital funding 
for existing districts to plant more trees, install more 
planter boxes and hanging baskets, purchase more 
benches and trash cans and other improvements. 

Leading to cleaner, greener and safer streets, while 
giving residents and businesses the final say on how 
the funds - they raise - can best be spent. 

In the process - we will also help these merchants 

and property owners 

fight the relentless scourge of graffiti, 

which - despite a considerable investment by my 

administration all too clearly remains a problem. 



28 



Cleaning up graffiti - simply isn't good enough. 

We must also hold those responsible for it - 
accountable. 

That's why we've partnered with the District 
Attorney's Office to fund an attorney to prosecute the 
worst graffiti offenders. 

And - I want to underscore this - that's why we've 
helped expand alternatives for appropriate artistic 
expression - which is not tagging stop signs. 

Now - San Francisco has always maintained an 
almost instinctive notion that we are all in this 
together - that we are one community. 
And that we all do better when the fewest 
are left behind. 

That is why we cannot forget the greatest challenge 
our city still faces - homelessness. 

Without question, over the last 3 years we have made 
great progress. 

I want to thank Angela Alioto and her team for their 
outstanding work over the last 2 and a half years to 
help end chronic homelessness... 



29 



With their guidance, we have made Housing First a 
reality. We've instituted HOMEWARD Bound. And 
we've launched Project Homeless Connect that has 
become a model for the nation. . . 

The numbers tell the story... 

We've placed 2,222 individuals in permanent 
supportive housing - 95% of whom remain housed 
today. 

We've created 1,891 new units of housing - a 152 
percent increase since December of 2003 - bringing 
us to 3,130 units of permanent supportive housing for 
single adults. 

1,656 individuals have been reunited with their 
families and friends through our Homeward Bound 
program since February 2005. 

And - get this - some 22,000 Homeless Connect 
volunteers have given their time to help thousands of 
homeless San Franciscans - connecting those in need 
- with medical attention, federal benefits - and a host 
of critical services. 



30 



In total, since 2003, when we began - some 4,263 
homeless individuals have permanently left our 
streets. That is progress. 

But all you need to do is walk down almost any street 
in the City to know - our job is not yet done. 

The fact is, the vast majority of the chronic homeless 
who remain on our streets suffer from addiction and 
mental illness. 

They are the highest users of City services and also 
the most resistant to getting the help they need. 

So here's what we're going to do. . . 

Through a collaboration of our homeless outreach 

workers, the Department of Human Services, 

the City Attorney, Public Defender, District Attorney 

and the courts, we will implement a new Serial 

Inebriate Program that provides treatment for chronic 

alcoholism. 

This program, implemented in 2000 in San Diego has 
reduced the number of chronic inebriates living on 
their streets from 750 to 175 today. 



31 



There is no reason San Francisco can't successfully 
adopt and implement a similar strategy to help those 
most in need. 

In addition, we will work with liquor store owners to 
limit sales of certain kinds of alcohol in critical areas 
of the City... 

It is wrong for liquor stores to sell high-proof alcohol 
to certain individuals at 6am in the morning. . . But 
they legally can do that. 
That's got to stop. 

I also believe it's time that we got serious about 
providing a comprehensive - housing based - work 
program... 

One that targets homeless individuals with histories 
of incarceration and substance abuse... Providing 
employment in return for housing, food and financial 
incentives to work and stay drug free after 
completing the program. 

I will be talking a lot more about this in the weeks 
ahead. . . . simply put - though - we need to create 
more job opportunities for homeless individuals so 
they can move forward to real independence. 



32 



And we must expand our Homeless Outreach Teams 
- to create new teams focused citywide, to reach out 
into every neighborhood not just the central city. 

Currently our teams are deployed in the Tenderloin, 
the Mission, South of Market, Mid-Market and the 
Castro. 

And while - these teams have helped over 300 people 
get into treatment or permanent housing directly from 
the street... We can replicate this success in every 
corner of our City. . . and I plan to do that by hiring 
more outreach workers with the support of the Board 
of Supervisors. 

What's more - expanding our outreach teams will 
make it possible for any San Franciscan who seeks to 
help a homeless person find that help by dialing 311. 

While we are making great headway reducing the 
number of people living on our streets - we must also 
do a better job addressing the quality of life crimes 
that don't make headlines but that make our lives 
much harder. 

Too often, we see people shooting up and dealing 
drugs in public. . . And far too many people are 
having their cars broken into and windows smashed. 



33 



We know that much of this crime is driven by 
substance abuse and mental illness. Services are 
important. But some people simply refuse to 
participate without strong encouragement. 

I know that District Attorney Kamala Harris feels 
strongly about this - and we agree that there needs to 
be more responsibility - more accountability - and 
more successful rehabilitation. 

The City will continue to offer treatment options, 
sure. . . but we're going to make it clear that, if you 
refuse treatment, there will be consequences. 

Because the truth is - these crimes, while minor 
under the law - are often committed by people with 
major records. 

We're not pretending we can fix these problems 
overnight but together with the DA, we will create a 
new Focused Enforcement program to target and 
address these quality of life infractions. 

This will be a pilot project - we're going to start 
small. 



34 



But the DA and I are optimistic that Focused 
Enforcement will make our city safer - and help 
those who need a little bit more encouragement to get 
off the streets and get the help they need. 

Now - while we are trying new and innovative ways 
to tackle quality of life crime - the reality is, San 
Francisco, like almost every major city in the United 
States today, is experiencing a surge in violent crime. 

There is no excuse for even a single homicide. 

But there is also - no single cure. 

Make no mistake though - we are already 
implementing new strategies to address the root 
causes and effects of this critical problem... 

...We are implementing neighborhood specific 
Community Policing plans throughout the City. 

. . . We're working in partnership with state and 
federal law enforcement agencies, including the CHP 
to increase saturation of resources in hotspots, 
increasing tactical and specially units, expanding the 
gang taskforce and extending the hours of our 
narcotics unit... 



35 



. . . we're working at a new level of collaboration with 
our public safety agencies to combat gun and gang 
violence with programs like as Project Gun Stop, and 
Operation Ceasefire, which are taking guns off the 
street and focusing police and prosecution efforts on 
gang leaders. 

... We're employing state-of-the-art technologies like 
Community Safety Cameras. 

... And we're continuing to civilianize the Police 
Department so officers are not behind a desk - 
including 23 officers that will be on the street in the 
new year. 

We've recently hired 153 new officers - 
complimenting the most aggressive recruitment and 
training program in recent memory. 

But to keep us on pace to meet our goal of 700 new 
officers by 2009, we must recruit upwards of 2,100 
applicants due to attrition and retirements. 

I urge San Franciscans to answer a new call to 
service - to become a police officer. . . to become part 
of the front line ensuring our city's safety. 

We need your help. 



36 



And while new recruitment is a priority - we are also 
doing more to retain experienced officers. 

Working with Supervisor Elsbernd and the Police 
Officers Association, just this week we put forward a 
proposal to create financial incentives to retain 
experienced officers, as well as incentives to recruit 
officers from other jurisdictions. 

Today, I call upon the Board of Supervisors to 
support this effort to ensure that we have the funding 
necessary to put this essential plan into action. 

But we all know officers alone are not the answer. . . 

It's not enough to be tough on crime - we must also 
be tough on the causes of crime... 

And that means we must stop playing in the margins 
when it comes to changing the conditions of poverty 
that create a generational legacy of hopelessness and 
violence. 

That's why we've created Communities of 
Opportunity - a groundbreaking initiative modeled 
after New York's - Harlem - 
Children's Zone, that re-invests City dollars 



37 



in a centralized and coordinated fashion 
in areas identified by the community. 

We looked at the data - and we found that there are 7 
corners - literally 7 street corners - that are the 
intersection of families most at risk and most in 
crisis. 

4 in the Southeast, 1 in Potrero Hill, 1 in the Western 
Addition and 1 in the Tenderloin. 

It is these neighborhoods that are - our Communities 
of Opportunity... 

Places of diminished hope but of great expectation... 

Think about this... 

In spite of the fact that we invest $98 million dollars 

a year in and around the 4 areas 

in the Southeast alone. . . 

. . . The numbers tell a very different story. . . 

Unemployment there is 50% higher than the city 
average... 

2/3 of the families there - live in poverty. . . 



38 



And by the age of 17, 

70% of the Southeast's African American males have 

been involved in the juvenile justice system. 

Clearly - despite decades of government investment, 
few residents or service providers are seeing the kind 
of positive results they deserve. 

At the intersections of Fitzgerald and Griffith... 
Sunny dale and Santos... Westpoint and 
Middlepoint... Oakdale and Griffith... 
Here - in our City's Southeast - 
Communities of Opportunity is taking shape. 

We held 50 community meetings and heard from 
over 300 residents to help shape the core principles of 
this unique, place-based strategy. 

Communities of Opportunity is anchored in 3 
bedrock principles: 

One - Linking services to results. . . 

Two - delivering services that will actually improve 
the lives of the people they serve ... 

And Three - Strengthening families to help re-knit 
the fabric of the community. 



39 



For the pilot phase launched last month, we've 
identified 2,600 families in-crisis in these 4 areas, 
and partnered with the philanthropic community to 
raise $5 million dollars to invest in programs with a 
proven track record for lasting change. 

We are creating Opportunity Centers in each of the 
four Southeast areas. 

These centers will serve as social and professional 
hubs for families and individuals. . . 
... Providing education, training, job placement, child 
care and other services meant to help residents stand 
on their own. 

By this time next year, we plan to train and place 400 
Southeast residents in new jobs. We plan to target 
1 00 of our highest-risk families with intensive 
wraparound crisis services tailored to their needs. 

I am hoping we can work with Supervisors Maxwell, 
Mirkarimi and others who have long called for a 
Marshall plan to address the root causes of crime and 
violence - to expand Communities of Opportunity to 
the other high-need areas of our City. 



40 



Let us not forget, however, that one of the best crime- 
prevention strategies remains a high-wage job. 

That's why we created CityBuild and CityBuild 
Academy, an initiative that offers low-income San 
Franciscans the opportunity to learn new skills and 
access high-paying jobs 

CityBuild leverages the billions of dollars we are 
investing in our infrastructure over the next decade to 
bring poor and working class San Franciscans into 
the middle class. 

To date, CityBuild has trained and placed over 240 
low-income San Franciscans in highly skilled, 
highly-paid jobs. 

And speaking of jobs, this past summer alone we 
created over 3,000 jobs and job training placements 
for at risk youth and adults - one of the most 
concerted efforts in our City's history... 

Central to any strategy to combat poverty and the 
underlying causes of violence - is quality education. 

We need schools that provide tools and opportunities 
for advancement that are too often lacking in 
underserved communities... 



41 



We need schools defined by excellence no matter 
which neighborhood they're in. 

That's why we have made an historic investment in 
our public schools of over $77 million dollars in the 
last 3 years alone. 

Well beyond what the voters called for in Proposition 
H. 

This investment has resulted in tangible 
improvements and benefits for our kids. 

We are gaining momentum in our effort to make San 
Francisco schools the reason people want to stay and 
raise a family in our City. 

Not the reason they want to leave. 

And to ensure that we don't lose any ground - we are 
working to create a first-of its kind Joint-Partnership 
with the School District. 

This historic Joint Partnership will make it easier to 
bring city services and resources to our students and 
their families - services like wellness centers and 



42 



after school programs, while also supporting anti- 
truancy and other initiatives. 

I have directed all City department heads 
who work closely with the schools 
to think even more strategically 
about ways they can further contribute 
to our schools. 

For example if an elementary school is without an 
adequate sports facility - and is close to a 
neighborhood park - then why shouldn't that school 
be given priority - as a user for that park? 

Or conversely - in a neighborhood where there are no 
parks - school fields could offer recreational 
opportunities for that neighborhood. 

The Partnership is about simple efficiencies like 
these, as well as broad policy changes - like our 
pledge to create After-School opportunities for all 
public elementary and middle school students. 

Last year, I pledged to provide after-school for all by 
2010. Today, I am proud to say that we are on track 
to achieve that goal. 



43 



This year alone, we will invest $2 million dollars to 
advance this initiative for 2,000 kids - at the same 
time leveraging as much as $5 million dollars in state 
funding for additional programming. 

We've also made enormous strides - as well - 
returning arts education to our schools. 

Thanks to the recently completed Arts Education 
Master Plan, we have finally restored comprehensive 
arts education to every child in every classroom, K- 
12. 

Now - every school will have a budget for art 
supplies, music, dance, professional development and 
even resources to host visiting artists. . . Making San 
Francisco one of the only school districts in the State 
with this kind of comprehensive arts curriculum. 

Our schools are making progress. . . 

But let us not forget that we can do better. 

That's why today, I am challenging our 

public schools to create 

a basic expectation for community service. 

I challenge every public high school principal 



44 



to create a new standard of excellence - 
one defined by service. 

The goal is to make community service a common 
experience - a rite of civic passage - for young San 
Franciscans on their way to responsibility and 
productive citizenship. 

In 1962, Bobby Kennedy spoke here in San Francisco 
at USF. 

He took the opportunity to remind the audience that 
since the days of Greece and Rome, when the word 
citizen was a title of honor, we have often seen more 
emphasis on the rights of citizenship than on its 
responsibilities. 

He also noted, though, that responsibility is the 
greatest right of citizenship - and service is the 
greatest of freedom's privileges. 

This was true 44 years ago - and it remains true to 
day. 

Let us commit, as Kennedy said, to this new 
covenant, a new fellowship of shared interest - an 
ideal of a just community - and let us start with the 
generation currently in our public schools. 



45 



It's time for all of us - politicians, parents and 
students to recognize that we are indeed, one City - 
and as I said earlier - one community. 

And that we are all strengthened when we contribute 
our time to those most in need. 

So I hope this November when we elect a new school 
board -that they understand the importance of 
community service... 

That's why I am supporting candidates like Hydra 
Mendoza - who I am proud is here today. 

Schools of course are one of government's greatest 
responsibilities and are at the very core of our quality 
of life... 

But quality of life is not just about good schools, 
clean streets or public transit. 

It's also about how government serves you. 

And without question, one of the ongoing frustrations 
for anyone who lives here is just how hard it can be 
to get a simple answer or basic service from City 
Hall. 



46 



But that's going to change. 

It's taken a little longer than I would have liked but 
finally, this spring, those 2,300 city telephone 
numbers currently available to serve you - will be 
replaced by a single 3 digit number that can be used 
to access a real human being... 24-hours a day,,, 7- 
days a week... 365 days a year,,, and available in 140 
languages. 

With 3 1 1, we have more than just a tool for residents 
to use to interact with their government. It is also a 
powerful management tool for making government 
more effective an more accountable. 

Once 3 1 1 is fully implemented - we are going to 
know how long it takes to clean up that trash, or fill 
that pothole, or move that car blocking your garage. 

And that knowledge is going to help us deliver 
services faster and more efficiently. 

While the 3 1 1 call system will make a big difference 
- many San Franciscans also have trouble accessing 
basic information - online. 



47 



If you are one of the 100,000 or so San Franciscans 
with limited English proficiency - your experience 
on our city web page has probably been, frankly, 
unintelligible. 

And with good reason. Many of the translations were 
simply gibberish. And much of the information 
simply wasn't available. 

We need to make sure that our web resources make 
sense in every language. 

That's why I asked our Assessor-Recorder Phil Ting 
and Treasurer Cisneros to lead the effort to make sure 
that our web pages start making sense. 

As part of our comprehensive overhaul of the City's 
technology services - non-English speaking residents 
can now look forward to culturally competent web 
services. . . and all residents can look forward to a 
new, more interactive and user friendly city web 
page. 

It's an issue of accessibility and ease. It's an issue of 
making the city a little easier to navigate and a little 
easier to live in... 



48 



It's an issue that goes directly to the heart of our 
initiative to make free wireless Internet available to 
every San Franciscan. 

WiFi though - in and of itself- is not enough. . . we 
must also take concrete steps to bridge the digital 
divide. 

That's why we recently created a city wide digital 
inclusion strategy. 

Anchored in free WiFi, our inclusion strategy will 
provide free or affordable hardware, culturally 
competent training and geographically relevant 
content to those communities too long isolated by 
poverty and violence. 

I challenge the Board of Supervisors to help us move 
forward in this critical effort by approving our plan to 
make free wireless Internet a reality in the next 
calendar year. 

From potholes to 3 1 1 , WiFi to cultural competency - 
we are making progress addressing the small matters 
that often matter most - but the reality is there is one 
very important quality of life concern that is anything 
but easy to solve... 



49 



... That is the unbelievable cost of housing. 

It is out of control. And it is driving out San 
Franciscans who have called this city home for 
generations. 

There is no one answer. But there are some clear 
goals. And it's time that we start meeting those goals. 

Last year, I announced our Home 15/5 plan that calls 
for 15,000 new housing units to be built in the next 
five years - 5,400 of which will be made affordable 
to low and moderate income San Franciscans. 

Last year alone, the City authorized the construction 
of 5,570 new homes - more than double the number 
in 2004 - and more than we have seen in decades. 

And while we invested a record $210.7 million 
dollars in this year's budget for affordable housing, I 
have to tell you - frankly, it's just NOT enough. 

We need more housing of all types - particularly in 
new and emerging neighborhoods. 

From where we stand today -we are just a single T- 
line ride away from over 9,675 units of new housing 
in Mission Bay and Rincon Hill - a number that rises 



50 



to 15,675 if you add Treasure Island, which I am 
firmly committed to moving forward. 

These new neighborhoods - which are models of 
community input and planning, as well as 
environmental sustainability - are also models of 
basic affordability. 

Together they will create 4,020 new units of 
affordable housing. 

What's more, the new plan for the Bay view Hunters 
Point Project Area calls for 3,700 new housing units 
- 25 percent of which will be affordable. 

Well above our inclusionary housing requirements. 

When we talk about housing, we need to be talking 
about housing for all San Franciscans including 
residents of our Housing Authority. 

And that means honestly dealing with the massive 
federal cuts in housing programs like Hope 6 and 
Section 8 enacted by the Bush administration. 

These drastic cuts have left us with a clear moral 
imperative - address the conditions in our housing 
projects - or allow them to deteriorate. . . and in so 



51 



doing - turning our back on thousands of our fellow 
citizens. 

That's why I ask each and every one of you today, to 
join me in an unprecedented initiative - improving 
the deplorable state of our public housing 
developments. 

Together with a broad partnership, I believe we can 
rebuild hope in our City. 

That's why we are initiating Hope SF - an effort to 
rebuild our most distressed San Francisco housing 
authority properties into mixed use, mixed income 
communities... 

. . . Creating more low-income housing. . . more 
middle-income housing,,, and more housing overall. 

Too many of our Housing Authority projects are 
scars on the landscape of San Francisco. 

They were built in an era when the federal 
government was focused on temporary, cheap 
housing. 



52 



They were dropped into isolated locations because 
the land was cheap and there was no neighborhood 
opposition. 

And they were built without reference to the 
underlying problems of poverty and unemployment - 
which caused people to need in the housing in the 
first place. 

There is another terrible chapter in this story - and 
that is the shameful history of redevelopment across 
this country and in San Francisco. 

We did something terribly wrong when we tore down 
our historic neighborhoods and replaced them with 
housing projects that are historic mistakes. 

We displaced and drove out families. And we 
incurred a debt to the people of those destroyed 
neighborhoods that has yet to be repaid. 

I can tell you right now - we are going to repay that 
debt - starting with restoring each of these housing 
projects to something much better than the original 
construction and something better than what was 
destroyed... 



53 



Right now these projects are not just some of the 
worst places to live. 

They are in some of the most isolated communities, 
far from jobs, services, and even the simple things 
like a supermarket or pharmacy. 

And ironically, they are also in some of the least 
dense areas of our city. 

We can use that accident of history to repair the 
damage caused by these projects. 

Because within the footprint of these projects is the 
space to replace each and every Housing Authority 
unit. 

But that's just for starters. 

Our plan includes adding ground floor retail, new 
jobs and services. . . adding units that can be rented by 
low income San Franciscans... adding units that are 
market rate. And creating new homes for sale. 

The goal is to leave the city with better 
neighborhoods, more housing, and finally - a clean 
conscience when it comes to the terrible history of 
neglect in public housing. 



54 



Hope SF will rebuild 2,500 new Housing Authority 
units, up to 1,000 new low income units, and we can 
help pay for this with 2,500 new family units for sale. 

We will create new neighborhoods... Preserve 
existing neighborhoods by relieving the pressure for 
new housing... And create new economic 
opportunities. 

And finally - perhaps most importantly - right a 
wrong. 

From where we stand today - at the nexus of the 
Bayview, the Excelsior and Visitacion Valley - we 
can see the future of San Francisco. 

A city we can all live in. . . 

A city that doesn't pit one group against another and 
let them fight it out... 

A City - not just for the few. . . but a City for All. 

It's both the big ideas - and the small things - that 
together add up to a City we can all call home. 



55 



I am proud of our accomplishments but frankly - 
they pale in comparison to our challenges. . . 

If we are to remain a city of constant possibility - we 
must once again - become a city that works. 

We will never stop dreaming big and acting boldly. 

But neither should we be afraid to roll up our sleeves 
to deal with the problems that never make the 
newspapers. . . but that make all the difference for the 
people of San Francisco. 

It's time to get back to the basics. 

Let's get to work. 

Thank you all for being here. 



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